Page 1 2 
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Leather boot soles
 Login/Join
 
Booshway
posted
I have pair of Fugawee hi/lo's with relatively thin leather soles. These things have become pretty slick and difficult to walk in. I thought about hobnails, but I believe they are too thin for that, which also makes me a little reluctant to cut any kind of grooves. Any other solutions out there? I know I can't be the only one with this issue.
 
Posts: 332 | Location: South Coast (MS) | Registered: 16 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Newoodsrunner
posted Hide Post
Pete try gluing the bottom of the soles and then put them is some sand let them dry I think you will find a big differance
 
Posts: 461 | Location: SW Okla | Registered: 02 September 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of GreyWolf
posted Hide Post
get some Shoe GOOP - spread it on kind of thick and sprinkle with sand. If thick enough you can also cross hatch.
The other option take to a shoe repair shop and have and added sole attached - either nonslick rubber or a thicker cross hatched leather.


aka Chuck Burrows
 
Posts: 616 | Location: Southern Rockies | Registered: 03 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
posted Hide Post
Take them to a cobbler and have thick half-soles or double half soles put on. Mine have the clover style nails with a 3/4 inch thick leather sole. Do NOT try to walk on marble floors with hob nails. Or hardwood floors.
 
Posts: 129 | Location: Southern California | Registered: 28 April 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
Picture of Stophel
posted Hide Post
Learn to walk with leather soles. Use your heels for traction. People did it for centuries. Wink
 
Posts: 48 | Location: Kentucky | Registered: 02 August 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
posted Hide Post
I took my hi-lows from Fugawee and had a second sole added to them at the Rockville Shoe Hospital. Then they were thick enough to accept hobnails. The guys at the hospital are Armenian cobblers, and know their stuff.

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Dick
posted Hide Post
Yes, learning to walk with leather soles is important, and can be done. My Fugawees had soles that wore out quickly--so my local shoe repair shop put new ones on--but leather. Non-leather soles show, and don't look right.

Dick


"Est Deus in Nobis"
 
Posts: 2902 | Location: Helena, Montana | Registered: 10 December 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Stophel:
Learn to walk with leather soles. Use your heels for traction. People did it for centuries. Wink


So true, but all those guys are dead now. I don't want to join then just yet.
 
Posts: 332 | Location: South Coast (MS) | Registered: 16 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
posted Hide Post
I had a pair of Western-style boots when I was younger that had a leather sole.I learned to walk in them ok, but I prefer the better traction of vibram(which doesn't gain you the enmity of anyone with hardwood floors).They were better for Square Dancing though.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1908 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Deercop
posted Hide Post
Boartooth, you reminded me.
When I was in my teens, I learned to track from a couple of elderly Mescalero Apache gentlemen who were passing along skills to the next generation.
My best friend was Apache, and I tagged along. I think the old timers got a kick out of having a non-Apache as a student.

The two old timers both wore hard soled moccasins. All of the students wore either tennis shoes or cowboy boots.
I noticed that the old timers took shorter steps and placed their feet flat on the ground, with their center of gravity over the back foot. Never saw them slip. Us tennis shoe and cowboy boot wearers took longer steps and hit heel first, with our center of gravity over the forward foot. We would slip. I started mimicing their walk with my cowboy boots (took a conscious effort, believe me!) and reduced my slipping.
Just thinking it might not be the soles so much as the way we walk these days.
 
Posts: 649 | Location: Clovis, New Mexico | Registered: 21 March 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pilgrim
Picture of Laughing Bear
posted Hide Post
Thanks Deercop. That's quite the timely reminder for walking properly in the upcoming season. Bowhunting's already on, and thunderstick season starts next week. Huzzah!
 
Posts: 61 | Location: Edmonton, Alberta | Registered: 16 March 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
posted Hide Post
Deercop,I learned (finally)in my 30's to shorten my steps and keep my weight slightly over the rear foot,like you mention,through martial arts training.Interestingly,it helped reduce my back problems as well as making me more sure-footed.....I'm jealous of you for the opportunity to learn from those elders,Good on you for making the most of it.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1908 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Deercop
posted Hide Post
I'd love to have a pair of those hardsole moccasins those elders wore. Parfletche soles, pointed, slightly upturned toe, knee high wrap.
They would be great in my country of cactus,agave,cholla,mesquite and cats-claw acacia!
I learned enough to impress my college professors when going for my Wildlife Management degree, and my fellow officers when I was a gamewarden, but didn't have a 5th of the knowledge/ability of those old men. I practiced it, they lived it!
 
Posts: 649 | Location: Clovis, New Mexico | Registered: 21 March 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
posted Hide Post
While we're on the subject,I'm going to try to start doing some leather work again,I've done a little,but nothing worth bragging about.I'm on the lookout for a pattern for simple,rugged moccasins as a starting point for Rondy,and as much everyday as I can get away with,garb.Those hardsole moccs would be great,we don't have to deal with cactus in my area,but sharp basalt,and obsidean can tear up your feet in short order.I'd appreciate any help available.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1908 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Deercop
posted Hide Post
Boartooth, I found a pattern for the Apache moccasins in a little book called Craft Manual of North American Indian Footwear by George M. White.

I got my copy of the book from Crazy Crow several years ago, I think they still carry it.

What's holding me up is finding a source for the parfletche to make the sole.
I was up at the Taos Pueblo awhile back, and found what I was looking for being used to make the heads on traditional drums, but couldn't find anyone who would sell me some. Gonna keep looking...
 
Posts: 649 | Location: Clovis, New Mexico | Registered: 21 March 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
posted Hide Post
I'm not familiar with parfletche,but if you find a source,I'd like to hear about it,thanks for the lead on patterns


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1908 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
posted Hide Post
I stumbled across a definition of parfleche.It's just the European word for rawhide.Now to acquire some books.....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1908 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Deercop
posted Hide Post
Boartooth,
I'm not sure what the difference in process is, but from what I've seen, most of what is called rawhide is translucent and greasy.
The Parfleche I'm looking for is thick, white and dry.
The Indians up around the Taos,NM area use it for drumheads on traditional drums. Still trying to find source.
 
Posts: 649 | Location: Clovis, New Mexico | Registered: 21 March 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of GreyWolf
posted Hide Post
WES HOUSLER
22 BELL CANYON ROAD
CLOUDCROFT, N.M. 88317
E-mail: wes@pvtnetworks.net
(505) 687-3267

check with Wes - he might know where to get the type you're looking for - most likely custom made though


aka Chuck Burrows
 
Posts: 616 | Location: Southern Rockies | Registered: 03 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Deercop
posted Hide Post
I am curious about the "White Latigo" Crazy Crow sells for moccasin soles. Price isn't bad.

Just FYI,check these out..Pueblo Indian Moccasins
 
Posts: 649 | Location: Clovis, New Mexico | Registered: 21 March 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata Page 1 2  
 


2014 Historical Enterprises, LLC