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Hivernant
posted
Hunting with a Jack Garner .50 cal with a 42 inch barrel.3/4 width flints match the lock well, but will not let the frizzen close completely.It barely touches,but will lose the powder if not careful. I have been breaking off a bit of the rear of the flint, but hate doing that. Anybody know where I can get some shorter flints? Do not have this problem with my of my other rifles..
Thanks ahead of time.
JB
 
Posts: 101 | Location: Davidsville , PA | Registered: 10 August 2016Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
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Are you notching the flint leather to allow the flint to sit deeper in the jaws of the cock?
 
Posts: 138 | Location: Cedar Valley, Travis Co., TX | Registered: 24 December 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
posted Hide Post
Will check that asap.
Thanks!
 
Posts: 101 | Location: Davidsville , PA | Registered: 10 August 2016Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
posted Hide Post
Flint leather is notched.
 
Posts: 101 | Location: Davidsville , PA | Registered: 10 August 2016Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
posted Hide Post
Hi John, I was having similar issues with my small Siler lock on a pistol.

Thought I needed frizzen work like hardening but after I ordered some small square shaped English flints from Track of the Wolf, problem solved!
 
Posts: 197 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
posted Hide Post
I have two small Siler locks; one on a pistol, the other on a rifle. It's definitely an issue that requires a bit of thought. The various outfits that sell flints usually have a list of various locks and the recommended flint size for that particular lock. The small Siler does require a small flint but there is also a different flint size recommended for an "older" version of that lock; both are usually listed. IMHO one must do about whatever it takes to get good flint fit.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3493 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
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It's weird. I will try the smaller English flints, but I know it will be narrower and not cover the width of the frizzen. I may have the older version. Rifle was built in the 70's I believe.
 
Posts: 101 | Location: Davidsville , PA | Registered: 10 August 2016Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
posted Hide Post
The flint doesn't have to cover the entire frizzen face to spark well. Many of my flints, when mounted, only address maybe 3/4 of the face and still spark like a downed powerline. Some of the flints are pretty wide and I sometimes have to mount them well to the outside of the frizzen to keep them from grazing the barrel; and yes I do chip away as much excess as possible from the barrel side edge.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3493 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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The way I interpret your first post in this thread is that the flint, with the cock (hammer)down, holds the frizzen back so that it does not close completely.

If that is the case, then I think it is normal. With the cock at half cock the flint should be just a fraction away from the closed frizzen.

When loaded and ready I carry my fusil that way, with the frizzen closed and the cock at half cock. If I am concerned about safety than I can put a leather frizzen cover over the frizzen. (that is not a cow's knee which covers the entire lock to protect it from bad weather)


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1260 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Notchy Bob
posted Hide Post
Is the flint secured with the bevel up or down? That may make a difference. If the bevel is down, the edge will contact the frizzen face higher, which may put it closer. You may gain some space with the bevel up.

The bevel up versus bevel down debate will surely rage for as long as there are flintlocks and grumpy old men who shoot them. I put the bevel up on the advice of Brad Emig, who told me consistency is one of the keys to good ignition. Flints vary in thickness. With the bevel down, every flint will strike the frizzen in a slightly different place. With the bevel up and flat side down, every flint will strike the frizzen in the same place. There are some very good arguments for the opposing point of view, but I took Brad's advice and have enjoyed good results in the various flintlocks I have, one of which is a Siler.

Best regards,

Notchy Bob


"Should have kept the old ways just as much as I could, and the tradition that guarded us. Should have rode horses. Kept dogs."

from The Antelope Wife
 
Posts: 333 | Location: Florida | Registered: 24 May 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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