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Booshway
Picture of Iche Iia
posted
I have what i think is a small Chambers lock, no set trigger. I have worked the trigger pretty close but "sometimes" it catches on half lock. I know it is because i don't pull the trigger far enough. I like a really light trigger but without it being double set, i am afraid to go "too far" with the tuning. My question is; would it do any harm to add a fly to the action?


Iche Iia

"Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he's too old to fight, he'll just kill you."
 
Posts: 378 | Location: Prince George, Virginia | Registered: 04 April 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I have never seen a Chambers lock with out a fly, unless someone removed it. The lock is meant to have one. Yes. Put one in. There should be a hole for the fly's pin stud, in a triangular cut out in the tumbler.
 
Posts: 556 | Location: geneva,fl | Registered: 29 March 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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If that is not a Cambers lock, and has no provisions for a fly, usually, the half cock notch can be trimmed back a little to allow the sear to pass by without touching. That would be the most simple way to go.
 
Posts: 556 | Location: geneva,fl | Registered: 29 March 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Iche Iia
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I will take it apart later to check but i am almost sure the hole is there for one. Right now we are dealing with the mess the hurricane left. No damage here just a lot of water. My friend at Va Beach got slammed with 87 mph winds and flooded streets and downed trees. She can't even get out of her col-de-sac because of high water. but I will look at the lock again soon. Thanks


Iche Iia

"Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he's too old to fight, he'll just kill you."
 
Posts: 378 | Location: Prince George, Virginia | Registered: 04 April 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Yep. I am right on the St. Johns river bank inland maybe 30 miles from the coast. Took no damage, but a lot of tree trash blown around.
 
Posts: 556 | Location: geneva,fl | Registered: 29 March 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Iche Iia
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WBE, i pulled the lock down tonight and did a touch up on the sear. And yes, the tumbler has a cut out and hole for the fly. I will order one tomorrow.


Iche Iia

"Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he's too old to fight, he'll just kill you."
 
Posts: 378 | Location: Prince George, Virginia | Registered: 04 April 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I feel for all those who got flooded. Two towns in western WA got flooded Jan. of 2015 and what a mess. I'm in the flood zone but didn't get flooded. So many did. I volunteered with Team Rubicon and helped remove insulation from under several houses. We also removed flooring, sheetrock, carpeting, and wall insulation from several houses. We also removed tons of mud and water from a WWII veterans basement.

All the work has to be done within 48 hours or mold begins to take over. Once that starts, the cost and rehab gets twice as costly.

In many cases, since these homes are in a flood zone, they have to be raised before the city will allow them to be repaired. For those with flood insurance, they quickly discovered the flood insurance doesn't pay to raise the home, only to repair it. If the home owner can't afford to raise the house, and therefore can't repair the house, they have to pay to have it torn down.

Once a family goes through this, they can't recoup their losses in todays economy. In some cases, many of them will find themselves homeless or living in an unlivable house. This will be very hard on school age children, not to mention their families. It's a real ugly situation and the government (FEMA) will not help them.

Sorry for getting off topic but those people really need our prayers.

Load fast and aim slow.
 
Posts: 1723 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: 08 March 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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Regardless of the type trigger on a gun the fly has never been anything but crucial. However, on my pistol with a small Siler lock, the cock would catch when the trigger was pulled resulting in a light strike and faulty ignition. I removed the fly from from the lock and the single trigger pistol now performs just fine. IMHO, a fly is not usually necessary on a single trigger gun.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3091 | Location: Virginia (by way of Georgia) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Iche Iia
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The fly came in last Friday and I installed it. Went to OVPR (local rendezvous site) for a work party then shot two days with some friends. The lock worked perfectly.

What I think was happening; I did some work on the sear and tumbler to make the trigger pull light, crisp with hardly any creep. Because of that, it was no longer necessary to pull the trigger very far and the sear would now catch on the half cock notch on the tumbler. Now, with the fly installed it worked flawlessly.


Iche Iia

"Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he's too old to fight, he'll just kill you."
 
Posts: 378 | Location: Prince George, Virginia | Registered: 04 April 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I much prefer a single trigger but it can be difficult at times to get a good trigger pull with a lock designed for a single trigger. Musket locks for instance, usually require a fairly heavy pull so that the trigger will sort of snap to the rear when the sear breaks, thus clearing the half cock notch. If the sear spring is altered or the tumbler notch is reduced in height it can cause problems. As a general rule (Hanshi's experience above excepted)a lock designed for a fly should keep the fly. The best way to reduce sear engagement is to solder a small shim in the notch to space the sear away from the tumbler. This can be especially important when you start reducing spring tension on the sear.
 
Posts: 329 | Location: South Coast (MS) | Registered: 16 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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