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Any sucessful/enjoyable hunts?
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Booshway
posted
Our small game and deer archery seasons are open here. However, Muzzleloader and gun Deer seasons are a couple of weeks away.

Has anyone had any success and/or have a good hunting story?

Curious, DanL


God bless America and Alba Gu Brath!
 
Posts: 502 | Location: God's farm in Alabama | Registered: 07 December 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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I have plenty of stories about successful/enjoyable hunts. Unfortunately nothing recent. Aaarrgh...!


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3456 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Any hunt for me is an enjoyable experience. If I am lucky enough to see and shoot some game that is a bonus. Getting old makes you appreciate your time spent in the woods, successful or not.
 
Posts: 13 | Location: SE CT | Registered: 27 March 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Last weekend was the opener for antelope here. A friend won a draw permit, so we headed out (he was using one of them newfangled suppository guns).

Over the course of two days, we saw 49 antelope, 7 mule deer does, 1 cow moose, 40 elk mingling with black angus, 1 cottontail rabbit, 2 sage chickens and 1 golden eagle. (Kinda sounds like some song, don't it)

The largest group of antelope numbered 21 does and 1 buck bedded down on a steep hillside. Closest we could get was 650+ yards before the sentry doe alerted the herd and off they went! All total we saw 7 antelope bucks and my friend considered only two of those hunt worthy, but no shots taken.

Needless to say, we came home empty handed, but full of fun experience. Not bad for a couple 85 and 75 year olds walking long distances and climbing steep hills!

Regards, xfox


The forest is a wilderness only to those that fear it, silent only to those that hear nothing. The forest is a friend to those that dwell within its' nature and it is filled with the sounds of life to those that listen.
 
Posts: 509 | Location: Bitterroot Valley | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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It has been asked; “What happens when it’s over?” Some say; “You go where you want to be again – where you were happiest.”

The Road To Tinkhamtown is a short story written by Corey Ford and first published in the October 1969 issue of Field and Stream magazine. It is about an old hunter on his deathbed, dreaming about a favorite grouse covert that he wants to return to.
Through the years since 1969 The Road to Tinkhamtown has become a classic among outdoor sportsman literature.

I really cannot say where I have been happiest, but North Mountain, in central Pennsylvania, readily comes to my mind as one of my favorite places. It has been many years since I was on North Mountain. There have been many long years and many long miles that I have traveled between North Mountain and my current home in Tennessee. Here, there are three mountains that play prominently in my life; Big Frog Mountain, Chilhowee Mountain, and Starr Mountain. However, none of these three stirs such fond memories in my head and in my heart, as does North Mountain.

Dutch Fields is a place far back in the Unicoi Mountains of the Cherokee National Forest in Polk County, Tennessee. Also known as the Dutch Settlement, there is nothing there now except a couple of overgrown fields and the stone rubble of a few old foundations. However, back in the 1840’s it was a small community of utopian dreamers. Their plans fizzled out and before the outbreak of civil war in 1860 they were gone.

The one-lane wagon road to the Dutch Settlement follows up Sylco Creek from the Ocoee River valley. The old road then leaves the lower elevations, bears off toward the east, and begins to climb higher into the mountains. It twists and turns, winding around deep ravines, up steep inclines, and down again, sometimes over hardwood ridges, other times through stands of tall pines, and through dense laurel thickets. Not having seen use in over 100 years the road, if it can still be called a road, is overgrown in places with saplings and briars. It is blocked here and there by fallen trees, and a few rocks that have tumbled down the mountain side. Throughout most of the year the only eyes to see the forgotten wagon road are those of the birds, squirrels, wild turkey, deer, and bear. A two-legged wanderer, like me, on the road to the Dutch Settlement is very rare.

Yesterday, I walked that road. Muzzleloading deer hunting season. It was 36*F at 8:30 that morning when I parked my truck at the trail head and began to hike.
About a mile down Sylco Trail, number 75 on my map, I left the trail, stepped across Sylco Creek where the water level was very low, found the old, abandoned road, and followed it up the mountainside.
Pig sign was everywhere. They really had the old roadbed torn up with their rooting around for acorns, mushrooms, grubs, and who knows what else. I slowed down and moved only a few steps at a time. Pause. Look. Listen. As quiet as I could be.
Three and half hours of slow walking later the old road entered a flat mountain bench and vanished. I circled the one acre size bench twice but I could not find any sign of the road continuing on. It just ended there. Had the extensive logging operations of the early 1900’s obliterated it? Was it not the road to Dutch Fields after all? Dutch Fields could not have been but a mile or so further on. I don’t know.
I sat down and ate my lunch. Then I returned the way I had come.
Plenty of wild pig sign, but no sign whatsoever of deer, bear, or anything else. I heard the staccato rattattattat of a woodpecker pecking at a dry tree, but I didn’t see one single bird. That is bad. Remember Rachel Carson and her book; “Silent Spring?” The signs bode ill for us.

Nevertheless, it was a relaxing, peaceful day for me.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1232 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Alas, all of my better hunting stories and places are in past years. A farm west of Hokinsville Ky on the Cadiz road back in the 60's was a favorite place for squirrels, rabbits, and quail. It had a nice creek that came out of a cave too. I don't think in the mid 60's there was a live deer in Christian Co Ky. Lived in Md. for 21 years but didn't do much hunting in that state. Went hunting around
Berkley Springs W. Va with a work buddy on his family farm. I did get a memorable deer with my 1863 springfield cut down to carbine rifle there. Also hunted a friends farm near Bedford Pa. but never got an animal there.

Moved to Az. in 92 and the best hunts here that I've been on were up on the clear Creek ranch around Winslow. My first elk was just west of east sunset mountain in 94. Cold and a little snowy that Nov. Got another elk on that ranch a couple of years later, and another several years later. All memorable hunts, good company and camping experiences. All three of my elk along with several others were processed by me and my frend with the swiss army knife single blade known as the Cowboy, Good times.
Also in Az. up near Seligman for several years we went prarie dog shooting up on the Boquillas ranch til they made it too much trouble to go there and hunt. Really primitive camping there but a lot of the dogs.

Around Yuma here there are rabbits and quail and deer plus javelina and varmints. Only killed two deer in Az. One with a 96 Buick and one up on the Yuma Proving Ground with a ,270. This was in 93, no deer since.
quail hunting out near Welton and Texas hill have been excellent over the years but them birds are getting hard to chase at my abilities nowadays. I'll try again when my back lightens up on me, hopefully soon. Maybe I should turn into a fisherman. Fishing is ok if not a little slow for my basic nature.


Yours in shooting
 
Posts: 32 | Location: Yuma Az. | Registered: 16 June 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Kelly, you dredged up some of my old Arizona hunting memories.
I had my best waterfowl hunting, ever, on the lower Colorado River down near Gadsden.
Mexico on the other side of the river. Jumped a pheasant from the riverside brush and it flew across to Mexico. Heck. The river was low so my dog and I waded across, found that bird, and shot it there in Mexico. Then dog and me beat a hasty retreat back to our side of the Colorado.
Of course, I was Border Patrol and I knew where all the sensors were set. Those days are gone. I don't advise anyone doing that today.
I did plenty of desert Gambel's Quail hunting all around the area.
Had a surprise meeting with a desert bighorn ewe up near Castle Dome.
But I got all my Arizona deer in the Mazatzal Mountains and the Sierra Ancha between Scottsdale and Payson.
Good times.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1232 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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I've only hunted in 4 states; Georgia, Virginia, West Virginia and Maine. Always fun to get out regardless. Fondest memories are from my 62 years in Georgia. I have plenty of tales, adventures and a few stories that are actually true. Big Grin

A lot of the adventures I've experienced are lies, but they are good ones. Don't even know why I still remember them since I have plenty of TRUE ones. For me Georgia was a deer Mecca, super generous limit, long seasons and big deer. Old and tired now so not in the same rush to get out looking for game. Still enjoy just roaming the bush, rifle in hand and taking in the sights & sounds. Always liked coming upon interesting things in the woods, some very weird.

Yeah, I don't know either.




*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3456 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Lololol!.....One'a them Eastern bunnies, eh?


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1887 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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https://americanlongrifles.org...ex.php?topic=68314.0

While the Maryland bear hunt didn't treat us well with weather or results, I bookended that week nicely. The link above (cause still can't post pics on here) is the MD early muzzleloader season, two days before leaving for the bear hunt. Biggest sika stag so far with the flintlock and got in om my new little place, not 100 yards out the back door. I have high ground here, too, was nice shooting one amongst old growth poplars and beeches and not having to hike a mile through marsh and swamp to do it. Smiler And then after the bear hunt the first nice morning I hunted the same spot behind the house for bow season, shot a nice 8pt whitetail that morning with the crossbow. May not be bear meat, but the freezer is filling fast.

I also have a trailcam pic of a huge 10 pt whitetail back here, hoping he comes by so I can fill my bonus tag. Smiler
 
Posts: 422 | Location: Delmarva | Registered: 22 December 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Very nice. Congratulations.
I know nothing about sika deer. It appears to have a black mane. Didn't know that.
Nice rifle gun, too. Did you see the story in Muzzleloader about hunting in Africa with a .58? He brought down a big eland with it.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1232 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Yeah, I saw that article. I know my .58 dropped a 354lb black bear in its tracks! Plenty of oomph. Smiler

These sika are neat animals. Mature stags have the nice black mane, as well as a bit of beard under thier chin. In the summer they are sleek with a spotted coat, in the fall and winter they bulk up, turn chocolate color before they even begin to wallow and coat themseelves with mud and turn almost black. All sorts of vocalizations including bugling, growling, mewing, alarm barks and more. Ours here are the smallest variety, Yakushima strain. One day I want to go overseas and hunt some of the 200lb Manchurian or Dryzbowski strains.
 
Posts: 422 | Location: Delmarva | Registered: 22 December 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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How large an area in the east are sika found?


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3456 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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They started with a half dozen on an island in Dorchester County MD just before 1900, probably 20,000 of them now. Primarily Dorchester and Wicomico Counties still, in the wetlands and marshes, but the rising tides and sinking ground are slowly pushing them north and to higher land. Still not common, but you can run across them up into Delaware and northern MD Eastern Shore counties. There is also a herd on Assateague Island MD/Chincoteague Island VA. Those came from a few sold from the original captive herd to a boy scout troop that turned them loose on that coastal island, again nearly 100 years ago.

People have gone nuts hunting them now thanks to the internet and Youtube and Facebook. Public lands are very crowded now with hunters from states all over
 
Posts: 422 | Location: Delmarva | Registered: 22 December 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Our muzzleloader season opened Monday, November 1. I hunted all day in one of my box blinds overlooking a sundero in a pine plantation flanked by an oak flat on one side and bottomland hardwoods on the other side.
Rut has kicked in here. Saw many doe and this past year’s fawns, several young spikes, 4 pts and some others with some messed up racks. Our fawns are 60-80 pounds this time of year.

Unfortunately, A decent buck did not come by all day.

Today, I went to a different stand. Not as many deer to see but the action was good. Young bucks chasing a couple of different doe.

The action slowed down and then a lone long faced doe wandered by. I got ready….

In about 5 minutes, a nice sized buck stepped out on the doe’s trail. He kept moving, nose on the trail. I picked a spot between some trees. He was quartering away frm me and heading away..when he got between those trees , I pulled the trigger.

BAM, smoke and fire, I could barely see him. He looked hit but I was not sure.. I reloaded slowly making sure to get it right ( powder, patch, ball). I walked to where he had been when I shot.
I looked in the direction he ran. THERE HE WAS, about 30 yards through the woods!

Wonderful two days of hunting. The buck was a 6 pt with a 7th small sticker not big enough to call a point. Aged at 3.5 years old. 155# Folks, this is a trophy here. We do not have large deer or bucks like the TV shows.

I hauled him on my deer wagon.

Feeling blessed, DanL


God bless America and Alba Gu Brath!


 
Posts: 502 | Location: God's farm in Alabama | Registered: 07 December 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Congratulations, Dan'l.

Muzzleloader deer in my section of TN opens Saturday.

Another segment of the TN bear season is open this week up in the mountains. I was going to go today, but this morning is quite cold and I don't feel like driving for an hour just to take a walk in the woods with crunchy, noisy leaves under foot.
I have work here at home that needs attending to.

I will be in the woods in my local blind for the muzzleloader deer opener! Buck or doe - right now I just want venison.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1232 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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'grats, Dan'l....I'd be happy to put that one in my freezer.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1887 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Congrats!
 
Posts: 422 | Location: Delmarva | Registered: 22 December 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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Thanks for the information, Osprey.

DanL, that's a large deer most anywhere and what I consider a fine rack. You did well, my friend.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3456 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Hi folks, I am out of the woods for a couple of days.
I had an interesting hunt the other day. As I have said before, rut is going on in my area.

The other morning I was sitting on the side of a bluff overlooking a flat where i had planted several fruit trees and some wheat in a narrow field. It was a beautiful sunrise and day. I had patiently waited for a couple of hours watching woodpeckers, squirrels and a plethora of other birds and wildlife.

All of a sudden I spotted a lone doe standing and watching something intensely. I got ready to shoot because something is going on here. The doe stared at something for 5 or so minutes. Then she briskly walked across the narrow field and went into a thicket. Still nothing followed her.

What have we here? 2 doe burst out of the brush at the other end of the narrow field and were running towards me. Get ready to shoot! Live action!

The 2 doe split up and ran in different directions. I look to where they had come from and a large brown coyote came running hot on their trail.

Bam! I shot the coyote where the 2 doe split up. Through the smoke, I saw old Wile E. Coyote laying there.

I thought that I heard the words 'thank you' echoing through the trees; it must have been my imagination.

Amazed, DanL

This message has been edited. Last edited by: DanL,


God bless America and Alba Gu Brath!
 
Posts: 502 | Location: God's farm in Alabama | Registered: 07 December 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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