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Booshway
posted
Muzzleloader deer season open here in my section of Tenasi this Saturday.
I had not been to my nearby, local brush blind in over a month. It was all ready the last time I was there.
Yesterday, I went to take a look at it. CRASH. A tall snag had fallen, catching several mid-size saplings and scraping down the side of the big popular that my blind is under; breaking off some branches.
Bullseye. All that debris landed directly in my blind.
I just spent a couple of hours today clearing it out. Now, I'm ready to go again for Saturday. Plenty of deer tracks in the area.

We may get out first frost of the season tomorrow.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1251 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I wish you luck!


God bless America and Alba Gu Brath!
 
Posts: 503 | Location: God's farm in Alabama | Registered: 07 December 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Mother Nature was just trying to build you a better looking natural blind to hide in!! Big Grin
 
Posts: 429 | Location: Delmarva | Registered: 22 December 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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Since I won't be hunting this year I look forward to hunting vicariously by reading everyone's posts and enjoying the photos.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3481 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Good luck guy.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1908 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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good thing you wernt in it. i try to stay a way
from dead trees sometimes you cant mother nature
can always throw you a loop. good luck.
keep us posted.
 
Posts: 32 | Location: mo. ozarks | Registered: 02 December 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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quote:
Since I won't be hunting this year I look forward to hunting vicariously by reading everyone's posts and enjoying the photos.


This is the first day of the muzzleloading deer season in my county, Bradley, of Tenasi. I left my home in the dark at 7:30 and walked the quarter mile to my local deer blind. It was chilly, barely above freezing, foggy, and dripping wet. The fog condensed on the trees and dripped down like it was a light rain. Other than the pitter-patter of the falling drops hitting the forest floor, all was quiet.
By 7:45am I was seated in my blind, my longrifle across my lap, and my shot bag and powder horn hung within easy reach on a sapling. Dawn was near and 15 minutes later there was enough light to see my rifle sights. It was a dull, dreary, gray dawn. Gray fog. Gray tree trunks. The woods were yellow in autumn dress, and there was still some green of cedar and cat briar.
In the distance a rooster crowed, announcing to the world what a wonderful guy he is, and that everyone should wake up now. A horseless carriage passed along the road. I was too far into the woods to see it, but I clearly heard its motor humming and its tires crunching the macadam. "Whooo ooo oo", the claxon horn of a train sounded forlorn and lonesome in the foggy distance. The railroad tracks are two miles away.
Water dripping off the trees; "pock, pock" on my hat and on my shoulders. A bird lands on a branch and peers at me, cocking its head this way and that. It is a sparrow. There are dozens of different sparrow species and I find them difficult to tell apart. But, I recognize this little fellow by the brown cap on the top of his head. A Chipping Sparrow. Also known as a "hair bird" for its habit of using horse, dog, and even human hair to line its nest. With a sudden "chirp", he flies away.
A flash of movement to my left catches my eye. Without moving my head, I shift my gaze as far to the left as I can. Two gray squirrels on the other side of London Creek, one chasing the other, both running as fast as they can. They reach a log jam and the fleeing squirrel hurls itself over the logs and makes a prodigious leap over the open water and lands on my side of the small creek. It quickly disappears into the alders and briars. The other squirrel stops on top of the log jam; its tail, bristling, flicks back and forth in agitation. Then the victor of their dispute turns and goes back into the brush on his side of the creek.
More birds, Carolina Chick-a-dees and Tufted Titmice come by to look briefly at me, then move on about their business of finding breakfast for themselves. At other times I have had wood mice run across the toe of my boot while I sat in this same deer blind. But, on this cold, damp morning I see no mice.
As 10am rolls near the fog has dissipated, but the day remains overcast, gray, chilly, and dripping wet. A breeze has sprung up. I feel it on the back of my neck. It carries my scent down my shooting lanes to the deer trail and the washed out beaver dam where the deer cross the creek. Usually, the wind is in my face. That is how I located this deer blind, downwind of where I expect to see deer. With this unusual contrary breeze taking my scent in the wrong direction there is little chance of me seeing a deer.
I pack up and walk back home.

Sorry Hanshi, but although I have tried, I just can't seem to get photos posted on here.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1251 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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