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Booshway
posted
Rangers in Alaska suspected poaching in a remote area of western Alaska. Recently, they set up several trail cameras in an attempt to catch the poachers.
Surprise! They got a picture of a Siberian Tiger. The huge cat must have crossed over to North America on the pack ice.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 879 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
Picture of Walkingeagle
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That'll get your attention quick!!
Walk
 
Posts: 237 | Location: Alberta, Canada | Registered: 15 January 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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I bet you could sell tickets to a Tiger vs Griz fight!!!
 
Posts: 215 | Location: Delmarva | Registered: 22 December 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I bet neither one would be eager for that match.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1449 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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If one could get here,two could.I'll bet the wildlife folks are scrambling to come up with a strategy to deal with a tiger population....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1449 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Here is what I saw. The picture did not come through, but is in computer code. I'm tech illiterate but maybe one of you can bring up the picture.

https://www.facebook.com/Togia...275217/?type=3Togiak National Wildlife Refuge
16 hrs ·
Togiak Refuge today released a photo of a highly unusual visitor to SW Alaska. This Siberian tiger was caught on a game camera that had been set up in an effort to document suspected illegal hunting activity on a tributary of the Togiak River.

Siberian tigers are native to eastern Russia, just across the Pacific from Alaska. They are a cold climate apex predator that has suffered from habitat lost (deforestation) across portions of their home range. While the presence of one here in western Alaska might be shocking to some, they are excellent swimmers and adept on the pack ice that would have been crossed to get here.

Game cameras are routinely used by biologists on the refuge. This particular camera had been placed on a river by law enforcement officers after several suspicious kill sites were discovered from the air. Initially poaching was suspected and the camera was set up at a likely spot on the river in an effort to document illegal activity.

There have been other unusual visitors in the recent years, including musk oxen and a wood bison, though this one certainly moves to the front of the line. Additional cameras have been deployed and area hunters and anglers are urged to use caution when traveling on rivers that drain into the Togiak River.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 879 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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I'm a little late on this but all the stories I saw on it came out on April 1st. I'm pretty sure its similar to the headline and picture I saw of kangaroos being reintroduced to their native ranges in Wyoming. That story also came out on April 1st.


Experience is the best teacher, hunger good sauce.
Osborne Russell Journal of a Trapper
 
Posts: 208 | Location: SW Montana | Registered: 17 December 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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Try this Link to The Tiger.

That's a big kitty. I wonder if it did arrive by "natural" means..., even though not seen before in Alaska as far as we know, if it could be caught and returned to Russia? Technically it's now a native Alaskan species since it naturally made it to Alaska, AND it's endangered.


LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3644 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Notchy Bob
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I have not been checking in on this forum very often lately, and I missed this thread until today.

The story about the Siberian tiger is intriguing, but the news broke on April first. On April 2nd, staff from the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge indicated the story was "our little jest celebrating the first day of April" on the Refuge's Facebook page. It was an April Fool's joke!

If you can find the photograph they posted, you can see the date 2016-11-04 in the upper left corner, meaning November 4, 2016. It is some sort of stock photo.

Anyway, those of us who were "April Fooled," myself included, should smile and take it in stride. I think it's great when we find we have not lost our sense of wonder, or our willingness to accept marvelous things in the natural world. Sometimes remarkable things do happen... For example, a Ruff Sandpiper was spotted near where I live in Florida this week, and this is no joke. I had never heard of this bird before reading about it in the paper, but they typically winter in southern Asia and Africa, and summer in the Eurasian arctic. This one took a wrong turn somewhere!

Anyway, if you are interested in Siberian tigers, I would strongly recommend reading The Tiger: A True Story of Vengeance and Survival, by John Vaillant. You can probably pick up a used copy cheap from Amazon or AbeBooks. This book tells the natural history of the Siberian tiger, as well as the story of this animal's interactions with human beings through history and up to the present day. This tiger is an apex predator and it knows it. The book is a terrific read. Some of the stories in it are incredible.

So, thanks to Rancocas for the original post, and for opening this discussion.

Best regards,

Notchy Bob

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Notchy Bob,


"Should have kept the old ways just as much as I could, and the tradition that guarded us. Should have rode horses. Kept dogs."

from The Antelope Wife
 
Posts: 309 | Location: Florida | Registered: 24 May 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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Thanks Notchy Bob! That confirms what I suspected! I recently received the book The Tiger A True Story of Vengeance and Survival in a book exchange with a guy form another forum. I'll have to read it soon.

Anyone in Alaska who thought the story was true should be breathing a sigh of relief. They're amazing animals that I'm intrigued with but I wouldn't care to spend much time in an area with tigers around. One study shows that 373,000 people were killed by tigers in India in the last 200 years!

For anyone that hasn't seen it look up the video of the tiger leaping at the man riding an elephant. The guy was very lucky but it goes to show their amazing power. I'm happy having an ocean as a buffer!


Experience is the best teacher, hunger good sauce.
Osborne Russell Journal of a Trapper
 
Posts: 208 | Location: SW Montana | Registered: 17 December 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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India was a unique case; millions of people living and traveling around in the tiger's habitat and an overabundance of tigers. Tigers are rare animals nowadays in India. Snakes kill the most people now.

If the Siberian cat was indeed found in Alaska, it would pose less of a threat than the brown/grizzly currently poses.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3089 | Location: Virginia (by way of Georgia) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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quote:
Originally posted by Hanshi:
India was a unique case; millions of people living and traveling around in the tiger's habitat and an overabundance of tigers. Tigers are rare animals nowadays in India. Snakes kill the most people now.

If the Siberian cat was indeed found in Alaska, it would pose less of a threat than the brown/grizzly currently poses.


Even with lower populations tigers still kill an average of 60+ people a year. I've lived the majority of my life in grizzly country and would take them any day over tigers. I've personally known one person killed by a grizzly and have a lot of respect for them. I'll still continue to sleep out in the open with a wool blanket in grizzly country in comfort. I don't think I would do the same around tigers.

The only "big" cat we have around here is mountain lions. Like I said, I have a lot of respect for bears but big cats are very different. Spending a good part of my life in the outdoors in fairly remote areas I've only seen two mountain lions. I know many more have seen me. Several times I've found very fresh lion tracks where they've either followed me or crossed my tracks shortly after I passed through and retraced my path.

With very healthy mountain lion populations and constantly playing in their habitat I've still only seen two. Increase that animals size 4+ times with the same level of stealth but one that regularly considers humans as prey and its pretty easy to see why I wouldn't want to live in "tiger country".

P.S. They can keep their venomous snakes too! Wink


Experience is the best teacher, hunger good sauce.
Osborne Russell Journal of a Trapper
 
Posts: 208 | Location: SW Montana | Registered: 17 December 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Hiya Fellas!

Wolfwoman and I got a big chuckle out of the article. She is a retired Alaska Dept Fish & Game field research biologist. One of her friends at ADFG forwarded the April 1 article to her, also stating that it was obvious that the guys didn't have enough work to do except posting the article. I held off posting about it being a joke here 'cause I wanted to watch tha fun!

Howsomever, thar is a Nushagak Tiger! I've seenum 'n' even been attacked by'em. They are a vicious and voracious critter that will plum suck life's blood from ye! 'N' they attack in squadrons! Their bodies are black and white striped 'n' they make a hideous buzzing sound. Pity tha poor soul thet gets targeted 'n' covered by'em. Them Nushagak Tigers are tha arniest critter alive bar none!

They have chased me back to tha floatplane many times. I'd just get the door close ahead of'em and would set there listening to the angry buzz and solid tinks of'em hitting the plastic windows. I enjoyed perverse pleasure from starting the engine and blowing the great clouds of tha critters all over tha place. Nushagak Tigers...They're tha real deal!

Keep yor eyes to tha ridgeline......'n' tha Deet close by!!

Regards, xfox


The forest is a wilderness only to those that fear it, silent only to those that hear nothing. The forest is a friend to those that dwell within its' nature and it is filled with the sounds of life to those that listen.
 
Posts: 426 | Location: Bitterroot Valley | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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Crossfox, I've heard the populations of winged tigers up that way is horrible!


Experience is the best teacher, hunger good sauce.
Osborne Russell Journal of a Trapper
 
Posts: 208 | Location: SW Montana | Registered: 17 December 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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quote:
Crossfox, I've heard the populations of winged tigers up that way is horrible!


AH BUT..., they do keep the population of Flying Monkeys from over population.

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3644 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Regarding tigers and bears, here's this from the Wildlife Conservation Society's Amur Tiger website:

"Elk, wild boar and sika deer, and roe deer make up about 80-90% of tiger prey across [Siberian] tiger range, with smaller animals such as badgers and raccoons, and larger animals such as black and even brown bears being occasionally taken during the summer months.  One radio-collared tiger studied by WCS ate more bears than anything else, at least during the summer months."

It appears that the Siberian/Amur tiger can hold its own in a bear encounter.

Notchy Bob


"Should have kept the old ways just as much as I could, and the tradition that guarded us. Should have rode horses. Kept dogs."

from The Antelope Wife
 
Posts: 309 | Location: Florida | Registered: 24 May 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Hmm,well now I know about twice what I usta 'bout Siberian Tigers.....On the other hand I can see just how close Siberia and Alaska are to each other.It would not surprise me for this article to be the real thing....Glad it's not though....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1449 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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I'm very late to this party, but some more great tiger reading are Col Jim Corbett's books, from India in the 20s and 30s if I remember correctly. The two I own are called The Man Eaters of Kumaon and The Man Eating Leopard of Rudraprayag. (Forgive me any spelling errors in those titles)

Very interesting books and told in a straightforward style that will still raise the hair on your neck. And if you follow up and read more about the good Colonel, you'll find a lot of times he was being humble about all he went through to kill these big cats. I'm with pab1, no kitties for me thanks!
 
Posts: 207 | Location: The Folle Avoine | Registered: 19 June 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I've read them both, and more. Jim Corbett was one of my childhood heroes.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 879 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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quote:
Originally posted by Rancocas:
I've read them both, and more. Jim Corbett was one of my childhood heroes.




One of mine, too.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3089 | Location: Virginia (by way of Georgia) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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