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Your definition of 'HUNTING'
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Booshway
posted
How do you describe the term or idea of Hunting?

My definition has evolved over the years.

Let me begin by saying I have been IMENSELY BLESSED to have had my family's private property (God's Farm) available to me all of my life.

As a younger me, I was intent on studying my quarry to the point of knowing everything there is to know about a species' habits and needs. This was to provide me with the "advantage" of being able to harvest or kill said species. I "Gave chase" with ferocity until I had accomplished my goal and acquired a 'trophy'.


Current me:

When I am going hunting or I am in the process of 'hunting', my loose intent is to go after some sort of game. I now enjoy just 'being there' and the year round process of 'getting there'.

A Deer hunt for example: Typically, my son, Grandson and/or close friends are gathered at my old family homestead (God's farm) for a weekend of hunting enjoyment. We talk, cook, eat, and even hunt a bit while we are there. When in a deer blind, I watch the sun rise or set and observe nature and watch for a deer to wander by. I sometimes take a good nap while there. If at the end of the hunt, I have not seen a deer, it is no issue, I have enjoyed the surrounding natural world for a spell. On rare occasion, I actually kill a deer. I process the deer myself and put it the freezer for the family to enjoy. This cycles back to the cooking, eating and talking at the farm.

Hunting for pleasure, DanL

This message has been edited. Last edited by: DanL,


God bless America and Alba Gu Brath!
 
Posts: 488 | Location: God's farm in Alabama | Registered: 07 December 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I do pretty much the same.
Growing up and started hunting in the 1950's with my Dad and uncles.
I strongly disagree with the "long-range" trend today. Set whatever mark you want, but for me 300, 400, or more yard shots are not hunting. That is simply sniping.
However, what I really miss is small game hunting. I grew up with beagles chasing rabbits. Then I started raising, training, and did some field trialing, with English Springer Spaniels. With those dogs I hunted pheasant, grouse, woodcock and waterfowl. I really miss that!


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1219 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Hmmm. My definition of hunting....I grew up a Navy brat. My Dad got transferred every 6 mos. or so(or so it seemed). Until he retired I didn't really see much of him, it seemed he spent most of his time at sea. When he did retire, I tried to get him to do "Dad" things. Like taking me fishing, and, or, hunting. Fishing he was good with but I couldn't get him to teach me to hunt. As we lived mostly in cities, or suburbs I couldn't just wander out afield and learn on my own. My Mom was dead set against me having anything resembling a weapon, but I could have improvised if I had the opportunity....I didn't have a firearm until I was over 18 and a dog got in with my livestock and killed a very expensive goat buck I owned. My Mom didn't have a say in that decision. I became a decent shot shooting popsicle sticks stuck in the ground at~50-75yards. Squirrels were in danger...Still no cooperation from my Dad....I had sporadic opportunities to hunt pigs, and squirrels over the years, but nothing serious...I finally figured out why my Dad didn't want to hunt; during WWII he was in the South Pacific participating in the Island Hopping campaign. While based on Guam there was a sizeable number of Japanese soldiers that had been left behind to harrass the occupying U.S. forces. The U.S. forces would use their free time to hunt these enemy "stay behinds" with the objective of lowering the danger to their bases( and combat boredom)...I never got actual confirmation that he participated in this activity but he was there, he was young, vigorous, and a good shot. He also never wanted to talk about what he did in any detail....He also went from an enthusiastic hunter in the Maine woods in his youth to not wanting anything to do with hunting in his late adulthood. The long and short of it is that I never had the opportunity to hunt anything with my Dad, and only occasional opportunities against squirrels , and the occasional pig. Sorry for the long winded soliloquy, but there it is.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1881 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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quote:
How do you describe the term or idea of Hunting?


My old dictionary says this; "Hunting; to pursue game or other wild animals for food or sport."

That is pretty much the basics of it, although it doesn't cover the ethics or morality of sportsmanship.

A long time ago I read that there are several phases to being a hunter. I don't recall the exact words, but basically one usually starts off just wanting to kill something. Then filling the bag limit becomes the priority. Later, bagging enough for a meal or two is the goal. And, finally, just being out there enjoying the day is enough reward.

Hopefully somewhere along the way one gains some incite on what is moral and ethical. There are no "market hunters" in North America any longer. Few of us actually must hunt for a living or for subsistence. We mainly hunt for sport.

What constitutes sport and ethics varies from person to person. I like the contest between the game and myself. The deer, or whatever, has an equal chance of eluding me as I have of bagging it. Sure, I miss sometimes, but I make a real concentrated effort to make my first, and hopefully only shot count. I try to get as close to my quarry as possible before I shoot. A quick, one-shot kill. I don't take shots that have a high probability of a miss. I don't take long range shots.

I suppose the definition of "long range" can also vary among hunters. To me, shooting at an animal that is a quarter mile away is not hunting at all, not ethical, and morally degenerate. It is simply sniping.

The pronghorn is an animal of the open plains. It has eyes like 8X binoculars. Getting close to one is difficult. Yet, it can be done.
They have been taken with bow and arrow.
That is hunting.

My longest shot at game, ever, was 192 paces across the Wyoming plains at a pronghorn. I had spotted the buck from nearly a mile away. I dropped out of sight into a coolie and jogged to close the distance. Then, I crawled flat on my stomach through the sage and prickly pear cactus before taking the shot with my .30-06.

That hunt occurred almost 30 years ago. Since that time I have made the switch to traditional muzzleloading firearms for all my big game hunting. Unlike the modern in-line abominations that I absolutely abhor, my percussion and flintlock guns are relatively short range weapons. Due to the limitations of my muzzleloaders and my own failing eyesight, I now keep all my shots at big game at 75 yards or less. That is the limit at which I feel confident of my shooting.

However, years ago I reached that final phase of a hunter. Filling my bag limit, or even bagging something for one meal is no longer my goal. Sure, it is nice, but just to still be able to get out in the fields and woods, or on the water, and enjoy my time there is much more rewarding to me now than any weight in my game bag.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1219 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Boartooth; sorry to hear of your deprived childhood. You certainly are not alone, however. Lots of city kids, and even many small town and country kids didn't have the opportunities, and maybe not the inclination to learn the joys of hunting.

My own father took me hunting when I was very young, but about when I turned 14 and was legally allowed to hunt on my own Dad put away his guns. He was always much more of a fisherman than a hunter.

I was lucky, however, in that my Uncle Frank was an avid hunter and he welcomed me to tag along with him. He was quite a woodsman, and he taught me much.

I have two sons and two daughters of my own. Regretfully, not a one of them has any interest in hunting. Nor do any of my 7 grandchildren, although at least one of them is an avid fisherman.

That one fisherman grandson and I recently made a surf fishing trip to Jekyll Island, Georgia. Steve is a great fishing buddy, and we had a good time there. Too bad that he has no interest in hunting.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1219 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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I was never a military brat, likely just a plain, country, run-of-the-mill brat. I was raised by my maternal grandmother in a rural area where people around us raised pigs, goats and chickens (we did chickens for a while). I could simply walk a hundred yards and be in shooting/hunting territory. This was in my native Georgia which I still love and miss. I have dozens of friends still down there and don't get to see them very often. Most of my friends didn't hunt so I took their orders and supplied them with venison. There were coyotes, bobcats and foxes for the taking and bag limits were generous.

The thing about hunting season that I loved was getting out in the solitude, peace and adventure of the forest. I loved bagging game that I hunted and the other critters were the entertainment. I bagged lots of deer with so many calibers (cartridge) that I wouldn't be able to completely recall without checking records and doing some hard thinking. BP rifles started in the mid 1960s and mixed with BP until I started finally using MLs exclusively. Cartridge rifles, I decided, were too easy and went to revolvers for the challenge. Back then I could see well, taught firearms at the police academy and did as well with the .357s, .41 & .44 as I did with the rifles. Next step was iron sights on cartridge rifles and finally 100% MLs.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3444 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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I too was raised in the navy. Step dad was a
CPO and WWII vet in the Pacific and didn't like guns at all and we didn't get along all that well. My first
gun was a BB gun and I terrorized small birds and such all over Kearny Mesa in San Diego in the late 50's. I finally got a Steven 22/410 inn 60 and terrorized the rabbits etc. First game critter was dove hunting in El Centro in 60 with the man across the street who taught me about guns and hunting. Ever since then I've hunted where ever I've lived. I believe in the fair chase hunt and that is how I hunt when I can.


Yours in shooting
 
Posts: 26 | Location: Yuma Az. | Registered: 16 June 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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Just my way of thinking but if you roam the bush for any game and are comfortable, then it ain't hunting (huntin'). I was only completely satisfied when my feet, face and hands got cold - and this is not a certainty way down South in Georgia. If I get comfy I doze off. Luckily I hunted with my ears. Many's the time when I was dozing and awakened by the "tic, tic, tic" of a deer drawing near. The sound is totally different than a squirrel rustling through leaves. One such was a buck on the far side of a little creek. It was dry and it sounded as if he was walking on potato chips. I heard him for several minutes before he finally presented himself in the open for me to drop him. At first I thought it was some duffer that didn't know beans about "deer looking".


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3444 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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