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<mtnmike>
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Now I want you folks who have/still do use tow for hunting purposes to chime in here, Everyday I try to go back another step in doing things like they used to be done,,my area of interest is the woodsman before the Fight for Independence,while I appreciate all the people did for Freedom,my people here in NC for many generations before & after have counted on the woods for food.
I carry a Carolina Musket replica(20 gauge) and want more than anything to do like it's 1750 or earlier, Any ideas,suggestions,etc,,will be deeply appreciated,So help me to help history live within me and through me.
Respectfully,, Mike Medley in N.C.
 
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Factor
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You might consider leaves or grass for wadding. Wasp nests too, perhaps, but I'm unsure how far back that goes.

If your fingers were any account you could nap your own flints . . .

Fiddlesticks


As long as there's Limb Bacon a man'll eat! (But mebbe not his wife...)
 
Posts: 4816 | Location: Buffalo River Country | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I use Spanish moss right out of the trees mike, also cut wads from old wool blanket. Killed many a squirrel with my smoothbore. Give it a try I think you will be pleased.
 
Posts: 617 | Location: Republic of Texas | Registered: 19 November 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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Don't remember where I read it but there was an article from back in the day where a colonial person was commenting on the wool felt from a worn out saddle pad made for the best wadding for his fowler. That's what got me to using wool felt for my wads.
 
Posts: 214 | Location: Big Arm Montana | Registered: 17 September 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Wasp nests work well and are free. Easy to find in the fall when the leaves are off. If you're really serious you'll wear period clothing hand made from the most historically correct materials available. Being correct isn't cheap, but you're either right or not.
 
Posts: 507 | Registered: 14 August 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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Wasp nests stink somethin' awful when the gun goes off. Seems like they 'enhance' the smoke a mite, too. But they're as cheap as dirt. Wasps gather the material, work like bees making good quality paper---for free! I've killed a'many a'squirrel using them. And hornet nests are might fine; the parts inside the hull, that is.

Truth be told, I've used the hull, too, but it's mighty crumbly . . .

Fiddlesticks


As long as there's Limb Bacon a man'll eat! (But mebbe not his wife...)
 
Posts: 4816 | Location: Buffalo River Country | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Mike, your journey into the past may be the most fascinating thing you can do. It is a process that will take time and dedication, if you want to do it well. I've been at it for quite a while and have a long way to go. I will never be satisfied. The reason I said it's expensive is unless you are a blacksmith, tinsmith, cooper, gun builder, spinner and weaver and who knows what all else you will have to purchase items from craftsmen who are. And that doesn't come cheap. There are quite a few people doing this if you look around, and they are a tremendous resource.
 
Posts: 507 | Registered: 14 August 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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