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Kakohaking Tribe?
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Booshway
posted
All esteemed members, especially those like Loyalist Dave from the Maryland and Delaware area;

Has anyone heard of the Kakohaking Tribe?
My wife is working on her family genealogy and recently found an ancestor who was in "the war of the rebellion", better known as the American Civil War. This guy was born in Brandywine 100, in Maryland. He joined the Pennsylvania cavalry in 1861 but was later severely wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg. He was then discharged because of his in-capacities.

Anyway, the story goes on that he was a member of the Kakohaking Tribe.
So, what is that? Indians? Fraternal organization? What? I've never heard of it and a Google search found nothing.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1262 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Well, it is not clear yet, but further research seems to indicate that the Kakohaking Tribe was actually a charitable organization for the purpose of helping with the welfare of the local Lenape (Delaware) Indians.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1262 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Hiya Rancocas

After checking and re-checking numerous references as well as variations of the spelling, the closest I could find is Cahokian. These were the Illimi (sic) tribe (Ilini;Ilimi;Illmi). And were thought to have been an eastern tribe (Virginia-Delaware-Maryland area) that moved or was displaced to the Ohio country. However, this occurred long before European colonization.

The word "Kakohaking" could be a phonetic spelling of "Cahokian", as even during the 1860's standardized word spelling was not in use in the English language.

Hope this helps!

REgards, xfox


The forest is a wilderness only to those that fear it, silent only to those that hear nothing. The forest is a friend to those that dwell within its' nature and it is filled with the sounds of life to those that listen.
 
Posts: 526 | Location: Bitterroot Valley | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Yes, I am familiar with Cahokia and the "mound building" culture of pre-European times. They were mainly settled in the Mississippi and Ohio Valley area. Cahokia was possibly the largest village. It was located in present day Illinois not far from present day St. Louis, Missouri.

However, the Kakohaking Tribe appears unrelated to Cahokia. The name came up in an 1880's biography of my wife's ancestor. Other than his time in the Union cavalry, he lived his whole life in Maryland near the head of Chesapeake Bay.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1262 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I've never heard that name before so I went and checked the books I have here on Eastern Shore indian tribes and no reference to it that I can find. Primarily only familiar with groups east of the Chesapeake though.

As an aside, there are several examples of old mound culture on the Shore, but the dates go back 10,000 years or so, nothing during colonial times forward.
 
Posts: 429 | Location: Delmarva | Registered: 22 December 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Yep. The Kakohaking Tribe was a chapter of a larger charitable organization for the benefit of the local Indians.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1262 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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