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Greenhorn
posted
not sure if I'm spelling the second word correctly, but since everyone here is reenacting the past. how many people are really sticking to the diets of the earlier frontiers people. like eating every part of the animal. or are there prejudices against eating certain stuff. even though I'm Asian American, I have some prejudices when it comes to certain foods in the Asian culture. I heard that Europeans are less scheemish about this stuff than Americans.
 
Posts: 18 | Registered: 14 February 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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With deer, or any of that family of hoofed ungulates, I like the heart and liver. In fact, liver and onions is a family tradition the first night after getting a deer.
The other internal parts, I discard.

I also like the heart and liver of upland game birds and waterfowl, but not the gizzard.

For small upland game such as squirrels and rabbits I discard ALL internal organs.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1261 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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Our 3 meal a day habits were not the norm back in the days of early frontier life. For many back then, a meal could have to get you through several days, with nothing in between.

When game was taken, people utilized just about every part of the animal. Not so much about what they liked to eat. More about their need for protein and filling a belly that went empty much of the time.
 
Posts: 197 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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Well, sometimes they did, sometimes not. "The Indians used every part of the buffalo" was the mantra when I was in high school in the late '70's. Then when studying anthropology and archaeology we found paleo sites had been discovered where large amounts of buffalo had been driven off a cliff to be killed. Only the hams were missing from the skeletons. So they knew how to use all of the animal..., didn't always do so.

Same is true for any people, and even animals in nature. Grizzly bears during the salmon-run leave most of the carcass behind, tearing off and devouring the skin of the fish.

With other foods it's tradition. For example, some folks have never had fried pork rinds, and I think even fewer have had chitterlings. Folks have heard of Haggis, but have they had any? Blood pudding anybody? So you get used to what you have around. Sauerkraut is well liked in Germanic areas of the world, but Kimchi in those areas, not so much. Where Kimchi is in huge demand, not much sauerkraut. Both are fermented cabbage, with one having some "heat".

When the supply is bountiful, you can be picky. Wink

Then sometimes folks are simply too ingrained in the past ways. Following WWII the United States shipped a lot of bread flour and crackers to Japan. Still, people were hungry, because "bread" wasn't a normal food for the Japanese. Momofuko Ando was a young man who noticed his hungry neighbors, and asked about the food shortage. The noodle factories that were still operational could not produce noodles any faster. So Ando started working on what became Nissan Food's Instant Ramen. Then one day he saw Americans working on rebuilding Japan, take the Instant Ramen, crumble it up into a Styrofoam coffee cup, then covered it with hot water and let it soak, then they ate it. Cup O' Noodles was born.

Instant Ramen is now the #1 emergency aid food on the planet. Ando's invention is credited with providing more than 1 billion disaster meals, since its creation. Very light weight per serving so excellent for air-transport, and encourages the person in the disaster area to boil the water to make the noodles.

So back to the thread, I love the heart, but the rest of the animal, nope, unless we're talking sausages..., OH and I eat a lot of pickled stuff most folks wouldn't think about pickling. String beans and squash for starters.....

LD

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Loyalist Dave,


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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I didn't realized Ramen noodles was that old. I've made chittlings, but my family can't stand the smell. now whenever I cook something that they don't recognize, they'll ask what it is before eating. never had pickled string beans. where did that originate from?
 
Posts: 18 | Registered: 14 February 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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quote:
never had pickled string beans. where did that originate from?


My Kitchen. Big Grin

I don't think I am anywhere close to being the "inventor" of them.

I am on a 8:16 eating pattern, plus a low starch diet (some say "HFLC" but there are carbs in veggies). 8:16 or 16/8 means that for 16 hours in the day I don't take in calories..., which includes sleeping. So..., I stop eating at 7 pm and don't eat again until 11 am the next day. I can have water, coffee, tea, but no calories. Working pretty well for this 55 year-old.

Anyway..., A person gets tired of steamed or boiled or stirfried veggies. Cider vinegar is also very good for you in helping you control blood-sugar levels, and vinegar is good for warding off mosquitos. So I thought, instead of standard cucumber pickles, how about some zucchini pickles? THEN I thought after those worked..., why not string beans? Both would be a change from steamed/boiled/stirfried !

Just "refrigerator" pickles. I take old pickle juice from the empty jar, and I add some cider vinegar, and a little water, and as I like the taste, I add some soy sauce. I steam the green beans for five minutes, while at the same time I bring the pickling solution to boil in another pot. Then I remove the string beans from the steamer (careful they're HOT) and put them into a a warm mason jar..., pour in the boiling pickling juice, and put the lid on. When cool they go into the fridge. Wink

These aren't fully "canned" by any means, but since I'm going to eat them soon, they don't go bad, and probably the acid level and sodium they would keep for a few weeks.

Works the same for zucchini, only I cut them into 1/4 pieces, lengthwise, and don't pre-steam them. Stringbeans is tough when raw, so the steaming softens them a bit, while still leaving some crunch after pickling. (Can't stand a squishy pickle!)

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Hiya jack1!

Offal is the guts, organs, brains, fats, bone marrow and glands of a butchered animal. In order to use and preserve as much of the animal for food, everything was considered edible.

Head "cheese" was made from the meat, eyes, etc of hogs heads and sometimes beef calves heads were used. Blood "cheese" from the blood of the butchered animal. Haggis was a made using the kidneys and liver. Pigs feet and snouts were pickled. Pork stomachs became tripe.

Sausage utilized the intestines as casings. And just about anything left over from butchering, including blood, lymph nodes, other glands and testicles was used as filling. Hard sausage was dried by hanging the ropes and sometimes hung in a smokehouse to cure.

The mountainmen made boudins using the intestines as casings, filled with chopped up kidneys, liver, fat and whatever else from buffalo, sometimes elk & moose, cooked over a fire.

My fathers favorite breakfast dish was scrambled eggs with calf brains mixed into them. My favorite breakfast dish is scrambled eggs with wild onions, mild jalapenos and smoked moose bone marrow mix together.

Regards, xfox


The forest is a wilderness only to those that fear it, silent only to those that hear nothing. The forest is a friend to those that dwell within its' nature and it is filled with the sounds of life to those that listen.
 
Posts: 522 | Location: Bitterroot Valley | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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None of this is new to me, I'm a country boy. Don't let anything go to waste. The first time I ate brains and eggs, I was kinda weirded out, but I'm adventurous with food(besides, my Mom said, "that's what's for breakfast. Are you hungry?" lol. Not bad, not as good as bacon with eggs,but very edible. Scrapple was very common on our table. I had haggis once..... I guess it's an acquired taste.....I guess what I'm trying to say, is that I'm not going to starve to death....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1928 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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I have at various points in my life eaten everything mentioned here. But that was then, and this is now. I don't eat meat - fish is an option for me - so that makes me a "pescaterian" rather than a vegetarian. Mostly I eat plant based food. I will not eat anything that comes from the inside of an animal, yuk! I'll just eat eggs, thank you. Roll Eyes

Like LD posted I, too, do the 16-8 eating pattern. The only difference is that I fast two consecutive days during each week. I can live with it, some people can't, of course.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3493 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of volatpluvia
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I've eaten lots of scrapple and sausage, not asking what is in it. I knew the word scrapple comes from scrap, but try not to think about it. Many taco places here offer 'cabeza', head, which include eyes, cheeks, lips and head meat. I never order it. When I am at a gathering and get served a broth with chunks of very chewy stuff in it, it is cheek. I just lay it on the corner of the styrofoam 'plate' and ignore it while eating the other stuff.


pistuo deo lalo
 
Posts: 3714 | Location: Acatlan de Juarez, Jalisco, Mexico | Registered: 22 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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It is nice to have the option to be picky like that.....We live in fat times folks. Enjoy while it lasts!


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1928 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Some are still considered good food!

There's Haggis in my freezer (sheeps lights = lungs etc) and Black Pudding (a similar thing made with pigs blood) I'll be having in a few weeks.

Brawn (headcheese) and Tongue are great as part of a ploughmans.

Sprats were a good treat as a kid (little fish fried whole) but I don't really eat fish these days.

In my student days I often ate Liver and Kidneys.

Always hated bigs foot and cow tail though!
 
Posts: 4 | Location: The Midlands, England. | Registered: 27 October 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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Watch "Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom" for tips on preparing your next meal! Eeker


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3493 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Lol.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1928 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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My mother's family came from southern Italy where pickins were slim. I grew up about 5 miles west of Times Square . back in the 50's my grandfather raised chickens, and rabbits. We had a garden that was easily 50 ft. x 100ft., we mostly fed ourselves. I learned at a very early age that you waste nothing. Being both of my parents grew up during the Depression, they remembered being hungry, and passed the memories on to me. I still put up a pot of tripe and sometimes Ox tails.
 
Posts: 353 | Location: Pocono Mts. in PA | Registered: 12 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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My wife just told me we only have one package of oxtails in the freezer!!! gonna have to get more. She makes an oxtail stew that comes from the Middle Ages, (YUM!)...It has orange juice in the recipe, and raisins....Boy, is it good!


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1928 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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When I was young, tripe was a staple in our Italize household for pasta dishes. BTW: tripe is cow stomach lining. I like liver with onions and bacon. For years I sold dressed rabbit meat that I raised. I would save the livers as my customers didn't want them. Then when I had a bunch I would make up a batch in gravy. Delicious. Have had brain, of course, sausage, kidney, etc. Never ate eyes that I know of.
 
Posts: 1487 | Location: Mountain Home, Arkansas | Registered: 08 October 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I wish I could find someone raising rabbits in my area. I didn't eat rabbit for several decades after leaving home in my 20's. When the domestic rabbit market collapsed in the '70's ( as a result of Australian imports that undercut our market) we ended up with a largish rabbitry, and a freezer that was full to the top with rabbit. We ate rabbit 'til it was gone. It was a LARGE freezer....Anyway, I've recently tried rabbit again, and (surprise!) found that I like it again.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1928 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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I haven't eaten rabbit since I was in my 20s. Killed them with a pellet rifle or whatever I was carrying. My grandmother cooked them up for me. I much prefer it to squirrel.

As far as anything that resides inside a critter I refuse to touch it and throw it away for the cleanup critters to devour. The only meat I've eaten for many years is just occasionally a bit of fish. Fair chase game would suit me just fine.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3493 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Heh, Have you ever eaten guinea pig? My mother raised them when I was a kid...LOTS of them. when she couldn't sell the culls from her breeding program, we ate 'em. Taste fine if you prepare them right. Those who've had both say they taste a lot like squirrel. I've never eaten squirrel, but only cause I haven't needed to. If things get tight,well, I've been feeding them for years at my bird feeder. It could be time for them to pay for the easy living.....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1928 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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