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Cornish Paste's (Pastee)
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Here is an old recipe my mother taught me when I was just a pup. First a bit of history with this one. Back in the mid to late 19th century folks immigrating from Cornwall England, settled in Michigan's upper peninsula and worked in the copper mines there. They brought with them this favoured menu item that was easy to pack away in one's lunch pail. It was essentially a meal all in one pocket that would satisfy the heartiest of appetites of the hardest working class folk. To make the dough for the crust: 3 cups unbleached white flour, 1\4 cup beef suet (blended into a paste)3\4's cup lard (you can substitute one cup of todays Crisco instead of these two ingredients but you will lose a bit of the old world flavor) a dash of salt and a small amount of water. Mix all the ingredients together into a dough ball adding water to get it to the consistence of a good pie crust (NOT TOO WET). This will make ONE dough ball. You will make several of these to use up all of the inner ingredients. Now for the middle inner "stuffing" ingredients; The meat you use can be as versatile as what you have on hand. I use ground beef "hamburger", or ground venison, or small cubed beef or venison roast sometimes mixed with small cubed pork. You will need 3 lbs. of "MEAT" , All vegetables are to be chopped into small cubes: 6 carrots, 3 medium size potatoes', 1 medium onion, 1\2 of a small rutabaga (you can substitute 2 or 3 medium turnips) I have also substituted 2 or 3 parsnips when that is all I had. Put the meat and vegetables into a large bowl and blend them well together. Time to roll out some dough! Separate the first dough ball into 3rds. Make a ball out of each and roll them out on a well floured counter. Roll into a circle. Using a large spoon, place a giant scoop of the filling unto to rolled circle of dough. This is when I season with a splash of salt and pepper. I then place just a small pat of butter on top of the filling and wrap the dough around it to form a half circle. Cut away the excess dough around the base of the "half pie" so you have just enough overlap to knot\crimp the pie into an enclosed sealed pocket. Keep going on this until you have used up all of the middle ingredients. As I said earlier, you will have to make several dough balls. Now, bake on a greased cookie sheet at 350 degrees for 1 hour. You can eat them right out of the oven or allow to cool and wrap them up in foil. Freeze for another time. This recipe will give you 12 to 14 large size paste's. Enjoy!
 
Posts: 197 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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Yup! Good'un Cran'! Venison works well in them. Dogged if you haven't flung a wishful desire on me to make another'n!

Bellygrowlin'Sticks


As long as there's Limb Bacon a man'll eat! (But mebbe not his wife...)
 
Posts: 4816 | Location: Buffalo River Country | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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Ah, the Cornish, aka "Michigan" Pastee. BTW folks my friends from Michigan pronounce it pash rhymes with "mash", and tee. No idea if that's a regional dialectic thing.

Now IF you follow the tradition of English working man's meals from the tip of the English West Coast in Cornwall, into the interior, you find a similar dish in Buckinghamshire, with the filling made of bacon, onions, and potatoes...this is then a Bacon Badger.

From Buckinghamshire, go to the next shire, to the East, to Bedfordshire, and make the pastry with two internal pockets, with one end filled with meat, potatoes, and veggies (or what have you), and the other end filled with jam or apple pie filling. Close it up and mark the end with the dessert on the outside of the crust...you have a Bedfordshire Clanger, or Clanger for short. Big Grin

Any and all make excellent day-meals in one's pack or haversack. Thanks for sharing the recipe! Wink

OH and yeah, proably not from the AWI or F&I, probably not until the 19th century.....so I promise not to let the tourist see me when I eat mine...LOL

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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Ya, and my wife has to just about box me behind the ear to get the ketchup bottle away from me when I go to diving into one of these! Ketchup! Guess it is good to live in modern days just for some small reasons of taste.
 
Posts: 197 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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OOOOOOh yeah, I just had a couple from Joe's Pasty Shop in Ironwood a couple weeks ago when in the neighborhood for work. Sure taste good when you're coming in out of working in the snow, and its pretty much always snowing in Ironwood.

Never made my own but you may have inspired me.
 
Posts: 207 | Location: The Folle Avoine | Registered: 19 June 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I hope you all are proud of yourselves,now my stomach is growling,and my wife is going to be "badgered"until she makes some....I love Cornish pasties.....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1927 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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I've a copy of Hettie Merrick's "The Pasty Book." Enjoyable reading. Mebbe I need to read it again. Loyalist Dave got me to thinking (ain't near the first time he's done that!). All those different names for basically the same thing depending on region, culture, etc. Seems there oughta be an Ozark version. Could be we need 'em made from squirrels. Use taters or turnips (we can't even spell rootybeggar, wouldn't know one if I saw it; I've heard talk of parsnips but always thought they were some sort of poison). Taters'n'turnips, that's us. We could call it a "squasty", perhaps.

Anyhow, I'm a pasty fan and glad Cranbrook brung it up.

Pasty'sticks

P.S.---AHA! Just took up my book and read where they made pasties out of deer as far back as the 1500s. Pasties were survival food. Now you take squirrels, why there's many a time if we didn't go to the woods and kill some of 'em we'd had no meat to eat. Too bad we didn't know about pasties then. Et plenty of corn pone though . . .

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Fiddlesticks,


As long as there's Limb Bacon a man'll eat! (But mebbe not his wife...)
 
Posts: 4816 | Location: Buffalo River Country | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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Funny you mention those rutabaga's Sticks! I have always preferred turnips for my pasty cookin. Around here the average size rutabaga is about the size of a basket ball. Not only are they hard as a brick, they're just too much for most recipes and the left overs just sit around and end up in the bait pile. Now another option would be kohl rabbi. hmmm, might have to give that one a try.
 
Posts: 197 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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I was taught that venison pasty is like a meatloaf from venison inside a "case" crust... the crust was water, flour, salt, and it allowed you to bake it, then remove it, and allow it to cool, while the crust prevented flies from getting to the insides or it spoiling...one scooped out the interior to serve, and didn't eat the crust...I'll have to look it up. (Eroll Flynn mentions the dish to Friar Tuck in the movie when he talks the good friar into joining up...that's what made me look it up as a kid.)

ANYWAY...

quote:
Seems there oughta be an Ozark version. Could be we need 'em made from squirrels.


Now this is a capital idea! If changing the insides to bacon changes the name...then changing the inside to squirrel should do so as well.

"Mountain Pasty"?
"Limber"? from "limb-bacon" the other name for squirrel
"Oh-Zark"?
"Zark?"
Somebody can probably come up with something better, but until then I might go with "mountain pasty".

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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Hey, Crannie? Are you sure you weren't trying to spell "cold rabbit?" If so, I can see that quite plainly. If not, then you oughtn't talk like that about a rabbi of any kind!

Doggies, Dave---"mountain pasty" rings a bell!

Fiddlesticks


As long as there's Limb Bacon a man'll eat! (But mebbe not his wife...)
 
Posts: 4816 | Location: Buffalo River Country | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I like mountain pasty also!


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1927 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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Nope Sticks, not cold rabbit! although I'd bet a cold pressed bunny would add some flavor to a good pasty! Not sure how they got the strange name but the kohl rabbi is in the cabbage family. Think it may be second or third cousin to them Brussels sprouts. Most likely on their mothers side. My pappy used to grow them and liked to pickle them with garlic and onions. They grow above ground in a "ball" at the base of a stem with cabbage type leaves. Tried cookin em once and didn't really care for em by themselves. Kind of like beggy's or turnips. They would need something akin to bacon added to make em palatable for my tastes. Coarse, you add bacon to buffalo chips and you have a meal! I did find a way to enjoy kohl rabbi a few years back though. An old Bohemian woman told me they are best eaten raw like those yuppy broccoli and cauliflower plates you sometimes run into at gatherings. Peeled and sliced thin and dipped in veggie dip. mmmmm mmmmmm goooood!
 
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Free Trapper
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I like the name "Ozark Mountain Top Pasty Pie" Almost sounds good enough to eat!
 
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Factor
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Lord have mercy, by the time you say that it will have gone cold. LOL Big Grin

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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For some reason it reminds me of Mountain Oysters.......


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1927 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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Was afraid somebody'd bring that up 'Tooth. Grrrrr . . .

Think I'll go back to "Squasty."

Ain't your fault 'Dave . . .

Fiddlesticks


As long as there's Limb Bacon a man'll eat! (But mebbe not his wife...)
 
Posts: 4816 | Location: Buffalo River Country | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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Sorry Sticks! But Squasty just won't due. That is what is left behind in the woods that is inhabited by them Sasquatch's! Good thing we didn't step in it! Big Grin
 
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Factor
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DAGNABIT!! How's about "Limb Pasty?"

Aaaargh'Sticks


As long as there's Limb Bacon a man'll eat! (But mebbe not his wife...)
 
Posts: 4816 | Location: Buffalo River Country | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Now,nobody has ever accused me of having a mind that works like everyone else's,mountain pasty might be just fine with most folks....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1927 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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All this talk of pasties got me to thinking about my Michigan days. Lived up there for near 14 years. I still have a friend up there in Kingsford in the UP. I used to hunt and fish in the McCormack Wilderness area a bit west of Ishpeming.

Those pasties are GOOD. I remember a little joint called "The Queen's Pasties", sort of a play on words, I reckon.

Meanwhile, among the Polish settlers down around Fort Detroit they have Paczki Day. Pronounced like pawnch-ki. A paczki is a pastry similar to a doughnut. Mighty good stuff!

However, I sure don't miss the snow! We had a little sleet today down here in Tenasi. That's enough.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1260 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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