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Dried deer corn
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Booshway
posted
Has anyone used dried shelled corn sold as deer corn to make parched corn for the trail?
 
Posts: 552 | Location: SC | Registered: 03 May 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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I have used Great River Organic Milling Corn

I've also tried "feed corn" for cattle. While it parched up great..., it has too much cellulous for a human, and has a rather harsh, laxative effect. So you have to find out if the dried shelled corn that you are proposing is "feed corn" or "human"corn.

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3842 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Try nixtamalizing the feed corn before you parch it. That removes the pericarp(hull) making it more nutritionally available. Plus, it's period. Native Americans have been doing this for as long as anyone can determine. Corn that has been nixtamalized is also known as hominy.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1887 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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quote:
nixtamalized


Now there is a new word for my limited vocabulary! Smiler

Thanks Boartooth
 
Posts: 197 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Lol, you're welcome...Took me a while to learn how to pronounce it.....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1887 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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quote:
Corn that has been nixtamalized is also known as hominy.


Well when it has been turned into Hominy, there is no reason to parch it. One then boils it for about an hour to eat it.

Part of parched corn as a long distance trail food is the expansion one gets from the fiber in the stomach, which is removed by turning it into Hominy. Wink

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3842 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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There's a lot of confusion re: corn. Most of which is generated by European colonists disregarding the advice given them by the natives. It's difficult to sift the hard info from the supposition. One thing that is well established is that a diet consisting of high quantities of non-nixtamalized corn can result in a disease known as Pelagra. this is how our corn(maise) got a reputation in Europe as being fit only for animal feed.See, the Europeans thought that nixtamalization was only to soften the corn so it could be ground with the natives' primitive grinding equipment. They didn't (for the most part) pay attention to what the natives told them about how necessary it was to nixtamalize corn.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1887 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Also, Deer corn is the lowest grade of corn you will see for sale. It's best to stick with Feed grade or better for this use.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1887 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
posted Hide Post
quote:
There's a lot of confusion re: corn. Most of which is generated by European colonists disregarding the advice given them by the natives. It's difficult to sift the hard info from the supposition. One thing that is well established is that a diet consisting of high quantities of non-nixtamalized corn can result in a disease known as Pelagra. this is how our corn(maise) got a reputation in Europe as being fit only for animal feed.See, the Europeans thought that nixtamalization was only to soften the corn so it could be ground with the natives' primitive grinding equipment. They didn't (for the most part) pay attention to what the natives told them about how necessary it was to nixtamalize corn.



Actually what we today call nixtamalization was indeed merely a method to remove the hulls from the corn. The fact that niacin (vitamin B3) is present in hominy wasn't discovered until after 1937. Because Pellagra is not from eating "high quantities of non-nixtamalized corn"..., it's from a diet difficient in B3 and tryptophan. So one could eat only ground corn meal, and be fine, so long as another source for B3 and tryptophan was present.

Which is what caused the confusion. Natives DID eat parched corn..., which was not nixtamalized. They used it as a trail-food, not as a staple food in settlements, and they had other foods along with the corn in the settlements. European colonists also ate a lot of corn meal, not nixtamalized, and had no ill effects. In fact it wasn't until the 20th century that the idea that it and other "diseases" were not such, but were nutritional problems.

Other such "diseases" are scurvy, and beriberi.



LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3842 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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