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Booshway
posted
I like SOUTHERN biscuits!

Through experimentation, I learned how to make a biscuit that suites my Southern taste buds right nicely.

The recipe for good southern biscuits is not complicated. It's right there on the White Lily bag.

A moment for a Story of the History of the southern Biscuit:

One has to use White lily flour because it is a flour made from a low Protein wheat. Ya see, in the old days, wheat did not grow well in the south. However, someone came up with a wheat that would grow in the south. It just happened that genetically this selection had lower protein than the average wheat plant. We poor southerners used the wheat to make our flour for there was not another choice at the time. If one does not use a low protein wheat flour, one will NEVER get the taste of a old time southern biscuit correct! Unfortunately, Few people today know what a GOOD southern biscuit tastes like.


HOWEVER, the SCIENCE is Correct temperature in the DO and the ART is working the dough properly. The ART only comes with experience and talking to a lot of Granny folks.

Trial and error, trial and error PLUS that bit of smoke in the DO.

Licking my lips now, DanL


God bless America and Alba Gu Brath!
 
Posts: 497 | Location: God's farm in Alabama | Registered: 07 December 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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I do roasts with vegetables and potatoes. chicken, ribs in my big dutch. Same with the middle size one if camping. I will bake biscuits but Im not really good with those.. I have a small dutch that I only use for dump cakes and such.
all I cook with generally is cast iron, camping or at home.


Yours in shooting
 
Posts: 31 | Location: Yuma Az. | Registered: 16 June 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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We also use almost exclusively cast iron, so our Dutch oven does duty as stew pot, soup pot, and baking pot for homemade sourdough bread....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1886 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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I did make some Mexican albondigas soup in a dutch once. It didn't work out very well. It had a very strong metallic taste and wasn't good to my taste buds. It must have leached the taste from the iron with all the different spices used for making it. I use actual Mexican spices in this soup. Never had a taste problem with stainless or porcelin pots. It's the only thing I've had a problem with.


Yours in shooting
 
Posts: 31 | Location: Yuma Az. | Registered: 16 June 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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The only idea I have regarding that is that the pot may not have been seasoned well enough...Cast iron does need maintenance.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1886 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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I don't know. It is an older dutch and has cooked all kinds of stuff. Never had soap near it and is seasoned well. Only thing I can think of is some of the condiments reacted with it. It has since been used and has given good cooking service. A mystery to me.


Yours in shooting
 
Posts: 31 | Location: Yuma Az. | Registered: 16 June 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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In my experience, Sometimes the acidic sauces like tomato or other can bring out the 'iron' taste a bit in the DO.I shy away from too acidic foods in the DO. It could also simply have been the length of time the acidic sauces were in the DO.

Like you suggested, the lack of or worn seasoning can allow some iron leaching with the acidic foods.


God bless America and Alba Gu Brath!
 
Posts: 497 | Location: God's farm in Alabama | Registered: 07 December 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Hoot Al
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I make apple and peach cobbler. My favorite is biscuts in the morning when camping.


hootalrifleshop.org
 
Posts: 1331 | Location: Rolling Hills of Iowa | Registered: 26 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Made a cherry dump cake today in my small dutch. Two cans sweet cherries, one white cake mix, 1/4 lb butter, and cinnamon sprinkled on top. I did line the dutch with foil. 8 cubes charcoal under the dutch and 12 cubes charcoal on the lid. The dutch was sitting on a trivit. Cooked about 40 minutes and it came out just fine.
Pour in two cans cherries, dump the cake mix on the cherries and spread it to be even. Drop the butter quarter in the middle and sprinkle cinnamon. That's all there is to it.


Yours in shooting
 
Posts: 31 | Location: Yuma Az. | Registered: 16 June 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Sounds delicious!


God bless America and Alba Gu Brath!
 
Posts: 497 | Location: God's farm in Alabama | Registered: 07 December 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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When I lived in the bush of Alaska, I'd make beaver chili using the hams of the carcass. No tomatoes in this chili. I used cumin with a touch of chili powder, fresh mild chili's and mild jalapenos, onion, fresh garlic cloves, and pinto beans that had been cooked the day before. The beaver meat was cube into 1/2 inch chunks, sauteed browned with the onion and peppers in sweet fat; then the beans and spices added, along with enough water to cover slightly; then simmered over the coals for several hours until thicken.

Served with fresh cornpone cooked on the over turned dutch oven lid...........So good after a long day in the woods hunting moose!

Regards, xfox


The forest is a wilderness only to those that fear it, silent only to those that hear nothing. The forest is a friend to those that dwell within its' nature and it is filled with the sounds of life to those that listen.
 
Posts: 509 | Location: Bitterroot Valley | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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