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Rockahominy and Snapsack Porridge
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I've mentioned this stuff a few times over the past 5 years or so, so here's how you make it...

Rock-a-hominy
1 pound of dried, dent corn
1 dry steel or iron skillet
wooden spoon
Metal bowl
high heat source like a campfire
Grinder, like a coffee mill

First you make Parched Corn by placing a layer of the dry dent corn in the skillet, and heating up the kernels until they brown. They will make a popping sound, but only a very few will actually pop from the skillet. When brown, pour the now parched corn into the metal bowl to cool, and repeat the process, until the pound of corn is all parched.

NOTE you can use this just as it is for a trail food. Some accounts mention adding sugar, so if you wish you may simply pour the hot kernels onto a baking sheet and sprinkle sugar over them. Maple would be the most authentic, but I'd opt for the less expensive Turbinado sugar or "Sugar in The Raw".

To complete the step to rock-a-hominy, you take the cooled parched corn without having added sugar, and grind it up. I use an electric coffee mill. Then you're done.

This was used as the emergency trail ration by a lot of different cultures. A table spoon or two will suffice for a basic meal, it is said.

Snapsack Porridge
1 cup to 1 pint water (depending on how much you want to eat and how thick you want the porridge)
3 tablespoons rock-a-hominy or more as needed
Copper pot
Spoon
Salt & red pepper

So you boil the water and add three tablespoons of the rockahominy to thicken and make porridge..., add more if you want it thicker.

For a more elaborate meal, you could add...
a cube of beef bouillon and,
Dried peas, or
Lentils, or
pounded jerky,or
an ounce of pemmican or English potted meat, or
a couple of ounces of dry bacon,

Basically the rock-a-hominy is going to be a thickener to what would normally be soup, which helps it to "stick to the ribs". In very cold situations, the pemmican, potted beef, or bacon should be considered (don't pre-fry the bacon) as the fat in any of those three protein sources will give the eater lots of calories for the cold weather.

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
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