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Greenhorn
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I understand your predicament, Been there, done that. Fortunately for me, it was many years ago when I severed all the tendons that connect to the quadaceps. After syrgery, I had a cast from my crotch to my toes, then after 5 weeks, that came off, and another went on that was just as big, but had the knees area open with plastic supports for therapy. I swear, the therapy hurt worse than the accident! Was off work an entire year. Now, at 70, that's past, thank God. I started shooting muzzleloaders some 36 years ago, and have been as active as I can ever since. Hang in bud, You can do 'er. Just take 'er easy for a bit.
 
Posts: 33 | Location: Bentonville, Arkansas | Registered: 26 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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Ron, I hope you get permanently in order and have no more situations like that. I've had my share of such injuries but no internal problems so far. Guys, we have to take care of ourselves, now. At the age most of us seem to be, healing is a slow process. Be safe out there.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3487 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pilgrim
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Thank you, Hanshi!
The trend is improvement on a day to day basis, with little setbacks now and again. I may not be playing pickup basketball anymore, but I will be happy with hiking and biking and maybe, hunting.

With Respect,
Ron
 
Posts: 62 | Location: Golden, CO | Registered: 10 October 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Walkingeagle
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It’s a darn good thing we are all too thick skulled to know anything other than to keep going forward! Welcome boys, pour that coffee and set down by the fire, more wood keeps gittin stacked on daily so she’s a burnin hot!!
Walk
 
Posts: 333 | Location: Alberta, Canada | Registered: 15 January 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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I too was smitten with the dreaded black powder disease back in the late '80's when my older brother lent me his 54 cal. T\C caplock to use for muzzle loader deer season.

From that learning experience, my old memories from my childhood seemed to come back and haunt me with dreams of Davy & Dan'l, who both for some strange reason had a strong resemblance to Fess Parker!

Anyway, I just had to have a front stuffer of my own and soon found a 56 cal. smooth bore percussion T\C Renegade that kept me satisfied for only a few short months.

I had joined a local shooting club where most of the "old timer's" were using fine flintlock rifles! I became infatuated with this system and turned to books about history along with anything I could get my hands on to read about these old guns. (this was pre-internet)

By this time I had scrimped and saved every spare penny along with selling all of my modern guns in hopes of finding a flintlock rifle that I could afford. Traveling through a small town on the other side of the state, I found and bought a custom 42 cal. flintlock longrifle along with a round ball mold for 800 hard earned dollars!

I was at the time, more excited than a young school boy on the night before Christmas!
I just couldn't wait to get that rifle out to the range and make some smoke!

My very first load, 50 grains of 3F Goex and a greased .41 round ball, pan primed up, I was looking down range and cocking the rifle at the hip when my thumb slipped........
Boom!!

Good thing she was pointing in a safe direction. Learning for me has always been through the School of Hard Knocks!
 
Posts: 197 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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quote:
Originally posted by Walkingeagle:
It’s a darn good thing we are all too thick skulled to know anything other than to keep going forward! Welcome boys, pour that coffee and set down by the fire, more wood keeps gittin stacked on daily so she’s a burnin hot!!
Walk




I agree!


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3487 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Well I guess I get to miss another hunting season because of having my shoulder replacement replaced. I guess that they'll keep doing it until they get it right. If I am lucky I may be able to get in the flintlock season. boy this old age is hard. I guess I really shouldn't complain as I am still active at 73. I have more metal parts in me than a new car does, knees,neck,back, and shoulder, almost forgot the stent in the heart. Come this spring I hope to make one half of the garage into a shop. I will finally be able to build my Lehigh County rifle. It has a 45 cal. Douglass barrel. The next will be a full choke 12 ga., I bought a damascus barrel, a Brown Bess lock, and I have a piece of walnut that has been drying for about 30 years. The hardest one will be making a new tumbler for my Pedersoli Kentucky 50 cal. That rifle can shoot and is extremely light. That may be a big help after they replace my shoulder. Remembering the old days makes me wish I could go back.Like Rancocas I grew up in Jersey, but in the northeast part right across the river from NY city. My muskrat trapline was about 4 miles from Times Square. I used to get on the bus with my shotgun to go to Secaucus to hunt ducks and railbirds. A normal after school activity was to take a 22 down to the swamps, which are now refered to as the Meadowlands, and shoot rats.The state used to stock my town and other surrounding towns with pheasants. I should of had a pheasant mounted so I could still see one. I miss the old days.
 
Posts: 353 | Location: Pocono Mts. in PA | Registered: 12 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pilgrim
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Looks like I am part of the New Jersey crowd. For several years of my youth, we lived in Southern NJ, in Clayton, near Glassboro. We often went to the Pine Barrens and camped out and hiked, even in Winter. My house was next door to a tomato farm and on the other side of the farm were the woods my brother and I spent many a day.When we moved to Philadelphia, I was distraught, missing the tomato and watermelon farms and the plentiful woods.
The only firearms we had at that time were non-firing, 3/4 size M1 Garands that we carried when marching with the Civil Air Patrol. I must say that the chromed Army helmets we wore while marching were really cool!
Ron
 
Posts: 62 | Location: Golden, CO | Registered: 10 October 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
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Hello all. I’m Tom.

Did a lot of .22 shooting growing up on S Arkansas. In Navy 1966-1970 I got to do some shooting including “informal competition” w MarDet off the fan tail of our carrier using Garands (off hand at 6 gallon SS milk containers at ? Estimated 5-700 yards W ship underway. Did well enough to embarrass a few Marines and earn an invite to shoot with them more.

In ‘73 and just out of college, I ran into a friend of my Dad’s who was shooting an original flintlock and let me fire a few rounds. Enough said. Found a TC Hawken flintlock in .45 at a good price. Didn’t work as well as the original so went pop gun for a while.

Took a job in NE Texas and ran into other ML shooters traded, bought and sold several and won some local matches. In ‘81 I won the Texas MLRA rifle championship. Now have won 8 TX championships,(offhand and Hunters multiple times, flintlock in 2015 and pistol in 2017) as well as Mid South in Memphis, Louisiana State and 4 National Territorials. Had a 20 year lay off in the middle due to kids, life in general and cataracts. Back about 2010 after cataract surgery and full time w flinters.

My child bride of 45 years has endured my affliction and even encourages me. I guess she thinks it’s better than running honky tonks.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Rocklock,
 
Posts: 138 | Location: Cedar Valley, Travis Co., TX | Registered: 24 December 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Walkingeagle
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Some good life stories there guys, thanks for taking the time to share.
Walk
 
Posts: 333 | Location: Alberta, Canada | Registered: 15 January 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Howdy Ya'll. I'm back in town after two weeks of roaming around the southwest. Visited a son in Tucson, Arizona for a few days. Then it was up to the Grand Canyon, and other sights coming back east again. Good trip


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1255 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Rocklock;
I'm an old destroyer man, myself. Same time frame as you, 66-70. You weren't on the Kitty Hawk were you? I had a buddy on her.
We did some skeet shooting off the fantail of my ship while crossing the Pacific. I don't know why we had them, but we had several H&R 12ga. single barrel shotguns on board and that is what we used.
I also qualified with the Browning M2 50 cal. machinegun. More FUN!
I used to do some pistol competition shooting and later I was a police pistol and shotgun instructor.
I've been a muzzleloader since about '86. I've done some chunkgun competion, but thats all. Always a hunter.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1255 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Hello all I am mento. I will soon be 70 yrs old good health. But my wife has Alzheimer's so don't get time hunt and shoot muzzle loaders as much as I like.just thankful I can do what I can to care for my wife.i am looking for a reasonable priced small cal. For squirrel.enjoy reading the post
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 18 December 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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Welcome to The Campfire, Meango. I wish you the best in your unfortunate circumstances. The stress you must endure is common for caregivers, so be gentle with yourself and seek help when you need it. I went through a similar situation with my mother and I know it can be taxing.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3487 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Meango,you're among peers,as far as the care requirements go.I was old enough to see what my parents went through with my Moms' Mom.More recently,my MIL went the same way....No way to describe the soulache.Just try to get out and decompress when you can,it's a long,hard road to ride.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1911 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Walkingeagle
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Welcome good sir, glad to have you aboard.
The road of life can be tough at times, twisty and rough, confusing and lost, and only the tough can get through it with satisfaction, fulfillment and happiness. Nobody gets to pass without pain and scars, for it is the fee to board the ride. Stay strong and ensure you grab every opportunity possible to relax and clear your mind.
Good luck with your ML quest, post pictures once aquired and visit often for a conversation.
Walk
 
Posts: 333 | Location: Alberta, Canada | Registered: 15 January 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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I am now retired and just have to work at keeping warm in Maine. Seven of us, The Ancient Ones of Maine will be headed to the Florida Vous next week and hope to meet some of you folks.
 
Posts: 37 | Location: Vassalboro, Maine | Registered: 21 November 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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Have a safe and enjoyable trip and fellowship. Alas I am stuck here in the Mid-Atlantic states in a cold snap that is setting records..., nothing odd in our temp for you folks from Maine, but for us, single digits before the wind chill is measured, and a couple of weeks of it...are hard. Eeker Funny too how all my gear for really really cold weather that I haven't worn for about five years has shrunk. Wink

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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LD, I've had the same problem. It appears that with the hot/cold weather that ends up super cold - such as we have had - the material permanently contracts enough to be too small. I also think clothes simply shrink over time. I say "over time" because anything I have in the closet more than, say, 5 years old has not only shrunk but changed it's shape. In other words, the upper part & shoulders are now too big and the waist has drawn up to the size of a pinhole. That's my story and I won't change my mind. Roll Eyes


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3487 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pilgrim
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Darn, you too, Hanshi!
I have some Army BDU uniforms in the closet. I think the military had some textile problems in the 1967-69 period because all my BDU's shrank! The shirt buttons and button holes are more than 3" apart.
I also have an assistant scoutmaster Boy Scout uniform that has suffered from that same shrinkage.
Ron
 
Posts: 62 | Location: Golden, CO | Registered: 10 October 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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