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Factor
posted
Hey folks just thought I'd share a source. Folks are having good results slightly reworking Ontario brand knives from their "agricultural" line.

The "Hop knife" can be ground slightly along the spine, and rehandled (for those who need to) to make a good belt knife. If you want a longer one you might with a bit more work adapt the "field knife", and the "cabbage knife" can be slightly modified into a nice scalper. They are 1095 steel and are very inexpensive. Just looking for a good camp cooking knife you might not modify them at all. (OH if you go to grind them, don't let them get too hot and ruin the temper. )

No they aren't as nice as a nice, custom made knife, BUT I like a good working knife I don't have to worry too much about losing. Funny... but I've lost a couple of really nice knives, but none of my inexpensive, workhorse knives.

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3644 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of MountainRanger
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that's a nice source, Dave. I checked out their website and they have some very decent product at a good price.


Sua Sponte
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Probably a decent knife. But, for project knives, do check out antique shops, flea markets and resale stores. They can be your friends for very little money.
 
Posts: 1454 | Location: Mountain Home, Arkansas | Registered: 08 October 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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That's a good idea too. Big Grin Not just for knives either. I have a small, copper kettle I got for $3 because it was a "decorator piece", but it was fully functional.

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3644 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Heh,I get lots of useful stuff from antique stores,like:my waffle iron,several cast iron pans,and my bottle-capper(much better than the new ones).


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1449 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of GreyWolf
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A suggestion - if/when using new blades check out the Dexter-Russell aka Green River blades.
Same quality and steel as the Ontario/Old Hickory knives but there are no fake saw blades marks and they are thicker like the older Ontario blades.
The blades come in various styles including butcher blades in varying lengths (I like using the 10" butchers to re-grind to blades in the 6-9" range since they are thicker). The blades are available from various sources such as Crazy Crow and Track of the Wolf.


aka Chuck Burrows
 
Posts: 616 | Location: Southern Rockies | Registered: 03 April 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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All good ideas, but as always ya gotta know what you're lookin' at and for. I don't know for sure when cutler's rivets appeared but I do know they aren't period correct for 1840. Good rivets for fastening knife blades can easily be made from 1/8" brazing wire or 1/8" brass rod from your nearby hobby shop. Four is a good number for most the scales on any utility knife.

Three Hawks.
 
Posts: 506 | Location: Puget Sound Area | Registered: 26 May 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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