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My English trade knife.
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Greenhorn
posted
New here and just getting into 18th century stuff.
My first item is a English trade knife from Ken Hamilton.
Here's a pic of it with my CS Pipe hawk.


Hope to get a nice hand forged tomahawk to go with it sometime soon.
also here's a pic with a CS frontier hawk


thanks
 
Posts: 12 | Location: Canada | Registered: 16 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Looking good.....And welcome!


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1928 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<mtnmike>
posted
Looks like a fine start to me! Congrats
Cool
 
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Booshway
Picture of andy*
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Great looking knife. Welcome to the fire.
Andy


Follow me I am the Infantry
 
Posts: 668 | Location: Everson, Washington | Registered: 27 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of MountainRanger
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welcome to the fire... coffee's always hot and will clean the racoon poop off'n yer moccasins. There's supposed to be a jug making the rounds too... hehe.

Nice blades! Hey, I just noticed that you're from Canada. Double welcome then. I had the opportunity to spend some time in Chemanis, there on Vancouver Island. Nice folks there.


Sua Sponte
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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quote:
Originally posted by MountainRanger:
welcome to the fire... coffee's always hot and will clean the racoon poop off'n yer moccasins. There's supposed to be a jug making the rounds too... hehe.

Nice blades! Hey, I just noticed that you're from Canada. Double welcome then. I had the opportunity to spend some time in Chemanis, there on Vancouver Island. Nice folks there.


I'm from out in the prairies. Saskatchewan.
My mom's Dad's family came from France in the 1640's. We have Mohawk in there too. My Mom's mother's Family was from Scotland came to Ontario in the early 1800's
My dad's family is from Michigan.
Thanks for the nice comments on my knife and hawks. some people on other forums don't believe the Cold Steel hawks are PC. But ya can't beat the price and they are great with some minor work.
 
Posts: 12 | Location: Canada | Registered: 16 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
Picture of TurkeyCreek
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Welcome to the fire there feller! That is one nice knife fer sure! And if them 'hawks do the work that's what counts. My old 'hawk is cast as well and it works just fine. Never seem to have the beaver to trade fer a hand forged one.


"They do not live their lives 'by your leave'! They hack it out of the wilderness with their own two hands, bearing their children along the way!" - Cora Monroe - "Last Of The Mohicans"
 
Posts: 186 | Location: Turkey Creek on Cimarron Drainage | Registered: 10 September 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of NWTF Longhunter
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Welcome to the fire, Smiler

Ya done good, that blade will serve you well
 
Posts: 797 | Location: Michigan | Registered: 29 April 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Notchy Bob
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Welcome, DMSmith!

I'll say you made a very good purchase. I have one of Ken Hamilton's English scalper knives, also, although mine is made in a somewhat earlier style. The +L pattern that you have is probably more appropriate for the "mountain man" era that interests most of the folks here. I inquired about getting one of those, but Ken did not have any available at the time and did not know when he would make another. I'm glad you were able to get one.

The axes from Cold Steel should also serve you well. I think you did a good job in "aging" them.

Enjoy your new cutlery!

Notchy Bob


"Should have kept the old ways just as much as I could, and the tradition that guarded us. Should have rode horses. Kept dogs."

from The Antelope Wife
 
Posts: 333 | Location: Florida | Registered: 24 May 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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quote:
Originally posted by Notchy Bob:
Welcome, DMSmith!

I'll say you made a very good purchase. I have one of Ken Hamilton's English scalper knives, also, although mine is made in a somewhat earlier style. The +L pattern that you have is probably more appropriate for the "mountain man" era that interests most of the folks here. I inquired about getting one of those, but Ken did not have any available at the time and did not know when he would make another. I'm glad you were able to get one.

The axes from Cold Steel should also serve you well. I think you did a good job in "aging" them.

Enjoy your new cutlery!

Notchy Bob


Ken said this was a late 1700's mark.

On another topic! I bought myself a green river 8 inch butcher knife and am re profiling it to look like a French style trade knife. I have most of the profiling done. It won't be totally correct as I am leaving it full tang but doing a Ball/pistol style handle
I'll post pics soon.
 
Posts: 12 | Location: Canada | Registered: 16 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Notchy Bob
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quote:
Originally posted by DmSmith:

Ken said this was a late 1700's mark.


Yup...Ken would know.

That "Cross L" mark interests all of us. I did get a knife similar to yours, with the same mark, but made by Randy Wolfe. The knife I have from Ken Hamilton is (I believe) more of a mid-18th century style, with a narrower blade and different markings (a sword, a "V," and an "I" with a crossbar in the middle), which I believe are attributed to William Parker & Co. of Sheffield, at least as early as 1774. See Trademarks of Base-Metal Tableware, by Eileen Woodhead. This document is online at this website. Look under the Parks Canada publications tab.

The maltese cross stamping does indeed date well back into the 18th century, although the cross may be combined with any of a variety of letters and other symbols (see Woodhead, above). A "Cross F," for example, is known on some old scalpers made by Furnis or Furness in the early 19th century. According to Bernard Levine (in Levine's Guide to Knives & Their Values, 5th Edition, +L mark has been dated to a table knife made by Thomas Law in Sheffield in the mid to late 18th century. However, the +L mark is most often associated with the Lockwood Brothers (founded in 1767) of Sheffield and later Ecclesfield. They originally made tools and cutlery, but definitely continued the production of Indian trade knives when they took over the John & Henry Sorby company in 1850. Lockwood became part of Joseph Elliot & Sons in 1919, and Mr. Levine says the +L mark was still listed as a trademark as late as 1952!

On the other hand, James Hanson wrote that "The +L mark was used by both the Hudson's Bay Co. and the Northwest Co. It was not a mark of a maker" (Fur Trade Cutlery Sketchbook, p. 12).

So, there may have been a "Cross L" scalper in the 18th century, and Ken probably knows of one. However, knives with this mark are certainly appropriate for the fur trade period extending well into the 19th century, also.

In any event, you have a really nice knife built in an authentic pattern by a highly esteemed maker. I hope you will use it with pride and enjoyment.

Notchy Bob


"Should have kept the old ways just as much as I could, and the tradition that guarded us. Should have rode horses. Kept dogs."

from The Antelope Wife
 
Posts: 333 | Location: Florida | Registered: 24 May 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Very nice looking.
 
Posts: 29 | Location: Central Pa. | Registered: 02 October 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
Picture of Johnny Reb
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Great lookin knife and TomaHawk


"All tyranny needs to gain a foot hold is for People of good conscious to remain silent"
Thomas Jefferson
 
Posts: 110 | Registered: 20 March 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
Picture of Fincastle
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Welcome Mr. Smith,

You certainly can't go wrong with a Ken Hamilton knife....


A nod's as good as a blink to a blind horse
 
Posts: 143 | Location: Indiana Territory | Registered: 22 September 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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SCHWEEEEET!

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pilgrim
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Good looking knife!
 
Posts: 64 | Location: piney woods of east texas | Registered: 23 December 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
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Good Trade


"I don't know where we're goin', but there's no sense bein' late." Quigley
 
Posts: 104 | Location: The Beehive State | Registered: 12 April 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
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Great knife that fits the period very well. No BS with it.
 
Posts: 140 | Registered: 18 March 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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