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Greenhorn
posted
Hey, all!

Unfortunately, I lost my files of recipes and such that I had copied from the Historical Trekking website.

I've seen a few good ones on the threads, here, so thank you to those who have shared, so far. I would be very appreciative if y'all could help me out and drop some more of your favorite foods and recipes for trekking!

Thank you, in advance!

Douglas
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Southeast Michigan | Registered: 07 October 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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try this to start. https://savoringthepast.net/

doggoner


The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government. --Thomas Jefferson
 
Posts: 31 | Location: Perkinston, MS | Registered: 13 April 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Here's another one. https://www.primalsurvivor.net/how-to-make-pemmican/

doggoner


The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government. --Thomas Jefferson
 
Posts: 31 | Location: Perkinston, MS | Registered: 13 April 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by doggoner:
Here's another one. https://www.primalsurvivor.net/how-to-make-pemmican/

Thank you, for the posting. As an aside..I went to Perk for my first two years of college. Wink Small world!

Douglas
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Southeast Michigan | Registered: 07 October 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Small world indeed, My house is about 2 miles north of the college. There is a 3000 acre plot of dirt that our hunt club leases and I own an acre in the northwest corner. Nice to step out the backdoor and be hunting. Not so good if you try to raise a garden.

for treks:

Hardtack,........... ingredients.

2 cups water
3 tbsp. oil
2 1/2 tsp salt
1 tbsp honey
2 eggs
1 cup powdered milk
1 1/2 cup wheat flour
2 2/3 cup rye flour
3 tbsp caraway seed
....... add 4 to 4 1/2 cups flour a little at a time.

Knead mixture until really stiff.
Roll golf ball size pieces until thin like pie crust, and cut into two inch squares.

Bake at 350 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes.
It will rise in the middle and be golden brown and crisp.

Enjoy

doggoner


The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government. --Thomas Jefferson
 
Posts: 31 | Location: Perkinston, MS | Registered: 13 April 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Hmm, that sounds more like a rye crisp recipe.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1880 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
posted Hide Post
quote:
Hmm, that sounds more like a rye crisp recipe.


LOL
Not that it isn't good, but when folks say "Hardtack" they usually mean a hard, baked biscuit made from flour and water and maybe some salt. Stuff that could be barreled or boxed and survive a long journey.

A lot of folks today make Hardtack with common whole wheat flour which is from hard, red wheat, but the flour of the ACW and the AWI was made from what is today known as soft, white wheat, and can be found in what we call Whole Wheat Pastry Flour. That's why the stuff when made is too hard to chew. use the right flour and it's a tad softer.

Further it was the lowest grade, aka "ship's stuff" flour, and they made ship's biscuit from it. I use a ratio of 3:1 whole wheat pastry flour and wheat bran.

Other trekking foods would be Parched Corn, or, you can grind it up after parching it and it then becomes rockahominy. Hominy will also work and it's different than rockahominy. Jerked meat, dry bacon, raisins, portable soup, and tea (black or green) might be carried on a trek.

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3842 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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LD, I wasn't aware of that difference in the flour used for hardtack. Thanks for the info. Also, if my understanding is correct, the difference between the two forms of corn used as trekking food is that Parched Corn is not nixtamalized. Hominy is, and is what Masa is made from.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1880 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
posted Hide Post
quote:
Also, if my understanding is correct, the difference between the two forms of corn used as trekking food is that Parched Corn is not nixtamalized. Hominy is, and is what Masa is made from.


Quite right!

Parched corn is dry whole corn, that is then browned. It was done in the ashes of a fire, but can also be done with a dry skillet. The Native peoples had found a long time in the past that parched corn lasted. (It should as the heat would've killed off microbes and bugs, and the lack of moisture would halt mold) PLUS..., the stuff is way easier to chew than plain dried corn!

The lye treatment of the horn husk, causes nixtamalization as you mentioned, and this binds niacin to the remaining portion of the corn, which allows humans to then absorb the niacin (vitamin B3), and thus the disease Pellagra does not happen. Hominy, ground fine is Masa flour, and ground coarse is grits.

Another name for rockahominy is "nocake" which is a bastardization of the Native word, "nookik".

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3842 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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