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Boiled Chocolate?
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Greenhorn
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My question is what kind of chocolate do you use for boiled chocolate and where do you get it thanks
 
Posts: 44 | Location: ohio territory | Registered: 02 October 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Baker's chocolate at most grocery stores!


"Don't Retreat, just reload"
 
Posts: 411 | Location: Oregon Territory | Registered: 26 February 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Ok thanks that makes it easy, didn't know if there was something special out there that people use to be PC, thanks for the info
 
Posts: 44 | Location: ohio territory | Registered: 02 October 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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You might also consider Abuelita from Nestle. The round container contains several "cakes" of the stuff, and the cakes are marked off in portions. It has a faint note of cinnamon too, which I like, and it has some sugar in it so you don't need to add sweetener.

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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i use semi sweet Baker's w/cone sugar but i like loose tea better
 
Posts: 461 | Location: SW Okla | Registered: 02 September 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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use baker's chocolate with dark brown sugar. this kind of sugar presses into a cake very easily. i use a toilet paper roll standing on a saucer and press the sugar with a wooden dowel. then peel off the paper roll from the outside. the hard cake can be rolled in butcher paper and fits in a corn boiler nicely
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 15 June 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Try Taza Mexican Chocolate. It comes in a round disk, like I saw of examples from the 1830s, and is really good. I personally like the Chipotle Chile flavor.Taza Chocolate
Says they are in Sumerville,MA, so should be available to you East Coasters.
 
Posts: 649 | Location: Clovis, New Mexico | Registered: 21 March 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of volatpluvia
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Deercop,
¿Chipòtle flavored chocolate?! Hmmmnnnnn...
If I find some down here I will have to try it.
León


pistuo deo lalo
 
Posts: 3714 | Location: Acatlan de Juarez, Jalisco, Mexico | Registered: 22 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Would the chocolate available then not have been similar to raw cacao/cocoa? Basically dried, ground beans in a grain/powder form.

I just ordered some for myself because not only is it delicious, it is also a healthy "superfood"! And I need all the help I can get... Smiler
 
Posts: 48 | Location: Kentucky | Registered: 02 August 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Processing of cocoa into chocolate had been practiced in Mexico, Central, and S America already for hundreds of years. Didn't make it with milk though. Usually with cinnamon, vanilla, or Chile.
 
Posts: 649 | Location: Clovis, New Mexico | Registered: 21 March 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Milk chocolate is nice,but Ive formed a real liking for Mexican Chocolate,specially the stuff with chile....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1908 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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The chocolate of the American colonies was probably very similar to unsweetened, baker's chocolate in flavor and when melted in water probably similar to the beverage...then add sugar. The cacao seeds would be fermented, and then roasted and then ground or actually grated, but I don't think you can get them into a powder form like modern cocoa.

The problem until the first half of the 19th century was the cacao butter, which makes it very difficult to emulsify into a beverage... which is why chocolate as a beverage was served with something to stir it for as one held a cup the cacao butter would form a layer on top of the beverage. The proper tool is called a molinet, but a spoon works fine.

When it was finally discovered how to extract the butter, cocoa powder was born, as also was block chocolate, and a whole new world of cuizine and confectionry was born.

Milk chocolate had to wait until Mr. Nestlé invented powdered milk, and then Daniel Peter in 1875 mixed the powdered milk with the chocolate...voila!

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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I just bought a couple of pounds of raw cacao. It is powdered. Apparently the only thing done to it is that it is fermented, sun-dried, and ground into powder. It is not heated at all (hence the "raw" designation). Modern cocoa powder is roasted, though I have no idea why.

My cacao, mixed with some Muscovado sugar (which seems to me to be a rather "weak" sugar, I guess since it is less refined) made into a drink is like drinking dark chocolate. I don't know that I would really call it "bitter", but I definitely want the sugar added. It is somewhat coffee-like. It tastes basically the same as the pressed block chocolate I recently got from Dobyns and Martin.
http://www.dobynsandmartin.com/beverages.htm

I have two different brands of raw cacao that I got from Amazon.
 
Posts: 48 | Location: Kentucky | Registered: 02 August 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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If you have a mex/Latino grocery store near by you can find it there. Comes looking like a hocky puck n is bitter sweet.
 
Posts: 229 | Location: Southeast Pa. | Registered: 03 February 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Heh,in our area Mexican style chocolate is in the main section,right next to the other chocolate products.This is in the regular,working class grocery stores.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1908 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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Down here in ol' Mexico we have Abuelitos. Ms. Audrey cooks it into milk and it is really good. You have to keep stirring the fibers into your milk. Comes in buttons about the size of hockey puks. The Mexicans love it.
Leon Eugenio Hombre del Bosque


pistuo deo lalo
 
Posts: 3714 | Location: Acatlan de Juarez, Jalisco, Mexico | Registered: 22 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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quote:
chocolate

This is what we use:

18th Century Chocolate Drink

2 cups water
4 T. sugar
1/2 block unsweetened chocolate shaved.
Boil all together till dissolved sprinkle with nutmeg to serve.

If you want to spend more money on it shop here.
http://www.fortticonderoga.org/store/products/edibles
 
Posts: 11 | Location: Ohio | Registered: 27 March 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I love both ,or rather all three ways of doing hot chocolate......


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1908 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I'll try that recipe. Sounds good


Sua Sponte
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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