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Factor
posted Hide Post
quote:
in my opinion, the magazine is becoming a historical magazine rather than a muzzleloader magazine.


OK folks so what would you like to see more of in the way of articles?

Production gun reviews?
Load testing for velocity and accuracy?
Taking a historic gun reference, and testing it for validity in today's repros?
Legislative updates regarding gun or hunting laws?
Shooting problem solutions?n Big Grin

ALL of the above?

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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None of the above, Dave
 
Posts: 507 | Registered: 14 August 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of MountainRanger
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I suppose that I might be in a tiny minority, but I really enjoy the history articles. I wish you could re-print some of the older articles that might have been written about Rogers Rangers. I get enough crap about 'pending legislation' from Muzzle Blasts and the NRA. Get calls too.

I do like the idea for articles about Shooting Problem Solutions and gun reviews. Maybe interviews with gun builders, horners, knife makers, etc. highlighting their work.


Sua Sponte
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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MountainRanger, it looks like we're in the same minority. Historical content is what sets Muzzleloader apart, and why it's the only gun/hunting/shooting magazine I subscribe to. The only other magazine I get is "Tomahawk and Longrifle".
 
Posts: 507 | Registered: 14 August 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I enjoy looking at some of the fancy fire arms. How someone can use a hammer and chisel on a piece of steel and create art amazes me. I hunt with a smooth bore that I put together from a kit. I proved to myself that I can take $500 worth of parts and make a $250 gun out of them. The fact that it shoots and fairly accurately, makes me proud. So I own an accurate, ugly smoothie. Every time I handle it I gain more respect for the artists in our ranks.
 
Posts: 353 | Location: Pocono Mts. in PA | Registered: 12 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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[quote]OK folks so what would you like to see more of in the way of articles?

No, No, No. Don't change a thing! Muzzleloader is my favorite magazine just as it is.

I used to get, and still do get, several different gun and hunting magazines. Most of them I let go, and the couple that I still get, I get just because I'm a lifetime member. I'll skim through them, but mostly I don't bother to read them any more because I'm no longer interested in their kind of story articles.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 1261 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of andy*
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I think there is a place for all of those articles in Muzzleloader.
I enjoy the historic articles. A well written hunting tale next to a gun review, followed by a how they did then can we do it now type article can all fit together.
I do wish more western fur trade articles were there, I really miss Rex Allen Norman's articles.
But it seems everything swings and shifts...a few years the magazine had western fur trade..now it is a bit more eastern focused, but its not the end of the world.Muzzleloader is the best magazine of its kind...
Andy


Follow me I am the Infantry
 
Posts: 668 | Location: Everson, Washington | Registered: 27 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
Picture of Willis Creek
posted Hide Post
Jason has taken the magazine in a new, more polished direction. As the sole surviving genre magazine, I feel he is doing the right mix of articles. It would be great to see more western fur trade articles, but you can only print what is submitted.


"touch not the cat without a glove"
"Much of the social history of the western world over the past three decades has involved replacing what worked with what sounded good. . ." Thomas Sowell
 
Posts: 143 | Location: South of the Arkansas, on the slopes of St. Charles Peak, Colorado territory | Registered: 25 January 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
Picture of TurkeyCreek
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I thoroughly enjoy the magazine. I like the history articles, the gunsmithing articles, the stories on current traditional craftsmen and their product and I love the hunting stories. As with many others I would like to see more on the western fur trade but that will come, as Jason has said, when writers (that ain't me!) start submitting more western stories. And even though I harbor no great desire to own a really fancy rifle or smoothbore, I do like to look at them and admire the craftsmanship that went into them.


"They do not live their lives 'by your leave'! They hack it out of the wilderness with their own two hands, bearing their children along the way!" - Cora Monroe - "Last Of The Mohicans"
 
Posts: 186 | Location: Turkey Creek on Cimarron Drainage | Registered: 10 September 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Well I am new to the magazine, and this site, but I think it is about the best around ,so please do not turn into one of those mainstream things ,that all they want to do is sell you things, not inform you about things and tell stories.


A gun without hammers, looks like a spaniel without ears
King George v
 
Posts: 29 | Location: staffordshire england | Registered: 17 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
Picture of Stone Fence
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I'm new here on this forum, but not new to muzzleloading. Like I said when I joined here, I grew up in the 70s & 80s with muzzle-stuffers. I knew then that I couldn't afford a custom-build from the masters (still can't) but they were sure nice to look at - then and now. So what it I can't have one? I can't have a lot of things I like to look at...

Somewhere between sharing knowledge about traditional crafts, history articles, traditional living, and hunting stories, Muzzleloader Magazine gives us something we can't get from other places.


My God! How little do my countrymen know what precious blessings they are in possession of, and which no other people on earth enjoy! ~Thomas Jefferson
 
Posts: 27 | Location: Southern Minnesota | Registered: 20 February 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
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I got flint guns I paid 2500 bucks for and guns I made for 600 bucks. I've had production guns and custom guns, fancy and plain. TVM, J.P. Gunstocks, Caywoods, and Pedersoli's
I liked 'em one and all....but its a lot easier to drop a 600 dollar gun than a 2500 dollar gun.
When a 2500 dollar gun (A boatload of cash to me)gets a scratch, its tough to take....on a 600 dollar gun, its just added character...
I've made kit guns from Track and kit guns from the Pecatonica River company and kit guns from companies I can't remember....
The one thing I've learned....Just shoot what YOU like and don't bother looking at what the guy next to you is shooting...More likely he's thinking, "Wow, I'd like to shoot HIS gun once"


Keep inside the tree line, Don't let 'em know where yer bedded. Some have less than you do and my be inclined to try and take what little ya have.
 
Posts: 107 | Location: The Soviet Socialist state of Connectitax | Registered: 29 May 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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That's all true Jimbow, but in my opinion a scratch while hunting on a $3,000.00 gun is character also, and expected.
 
Posts: 507 | Registered: 14 August 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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I sorta agree with you, scoundrel. To my mind there's no reason to cry over FW&T. It happens no matter haw careful one is. I don't like to see emerging dings and scratches on my stocks but there's really no way to prevent it from happening.

Same goes for bluing/browning wear and brass tarnishing. Occasionally barrel dings appear but these and stock blemishes do add some character. What I can't abide is finding a major gouge or groove that got there via some sort of trauma. If bad enough, these flaws maybe should be attended to.

At present virtually all my smoke poles have flaws; but they are they're from FW&T, not accident or abuse. Certainly no one wants a "working" gun looking factory new. They should look as if they've been out in the brush.

In fact, this is so unavoidable that I long ago stopped polishing the brass. I mostly just let it age. Don't mind FW&T/character; but not trauma or abuse.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3493 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of andy*
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I hunt and shoot all the time with my custom Hawken copy and while I don't want a ding or scratch... those things can happen if you use the rifle as intended.
Having fixed some original rifles using period style repairs, I can say that most of the rifles I have seen, or own have use but not abuse marks.
Andy


Follow me I am the Infantry
 
Posts: 668 | Location: Everson, Washington | Registered: 27 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Jimbow:
....but its a lot easier to drop a 600 dollar gun than a 2500 dollar gun.



Oh no, it is just as easy to drop a $2500 gun as a $600 gun. The problems begin when you pick it back up.
 
Posts: 332 | Location: South Coast (MS) | Registered: 16 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I am having noted ML rifle builder Steve Zihn build me an exact copy of the Mario Modena Hawken Rifle. How, you say, will I know it is 100% true to the original? Because I held the original in my own two hands on the 27th of this month. I will cost me about $2000, plus the wood.

You just have to want one. My first ML was a $125 T/C. Traded it even for a CVA Mtn Rifle. Then in 1982, the fine Uberti Santa Fe Hawken (remember them and the Ed Webber/John Baird deal?)Then, a friend built me a nice custom for about $600.
Then a TVM Early Lancaster ($1400), and now, four years later, this exact copy of the Modena rifle.

It will be the most expensive rifle I own. I spent 25 months and 10 days in Vietnam in an Army Ranger Unit. As a result, I am a 100% disabled Veteran. My lovely wife has stood by me forever...

Rich

PS: a year and $2K, about $175 a month...

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Idaho Sharpshooter,
 
Posts: 363 | Registered: 25 July 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Sounds like a beautiful piece.Congrats bud...


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1928 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of MountainRanger
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Rich, I was there 19 months and a bit (Darlac Province, II Corps) Also Ranger with other Rangers. Note our motto at the bottom of my posts: Sua Sponte. I salute you for your past and for the present. Can't wait to see pictures of the finished rifle.


Sua Sponte
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Jimbow; great comment. I actually had a muzzleloader damaged beyond repair while hunting. My hunting partner about had a cow when he discovered the damage. My quote was, "That's why I don't carry $1000 guns in the woods on hunting trips." It was a LGP rifle damaged during the early season in October. By the late season starting at Thanksgiving, I had the rifle replaced and sighted in an ready for the hunt. Was I upset? Not really, just learned a lesson in what fatigue can do.

Load fast and aim slow.
 
Posts: 1726 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: 08 March 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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