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Hivernant
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quote:
OK folks so what would you like to see more of in the way of articles?Production gun reviews?Load testing for velocity and accuracy?




Production gun reviews? YES
Load testing for velocity and accuracy? YES
 
Posts: 138 | Location: Cedar Valley, Travis Co., TX | Registered: 24 December 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Umm,yeah,I wouldn't be aware of the existence of production guns from reading Muzzle Loader...I love seeing the articles about the beautiful classic pieces,but I would also would like to see what's out there as far as affordable shooters.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1927 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
Picture of Willis Creek
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There are lots of venues for finding out about the latest mass production blackpowder rifles. True historically centered magazines that cover craft rifles, true works of art that spring from the hand of traditional craftspeople are as rare as hens teeth. Anybody remember the Buckskin Report or any of the other magazines that have gone under? Muzzleloader fills a unique slot in publishing and has done so since the early 70s. Be very careful about changing a successful format.


"touch not the cat without a glove"
"Much of the social history of the western world over the past three decades has involved replacing what worked with what sounded good. . ." Thomas Sowell
 
Posts: 143 | Location: South of the Arkansas, on the slopes of St. Charles Peak, Colorado territory | Registered: 25 January 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
Picture of Willis Creek
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Muzzle Blasts, the publication of the National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association already covers production rifles.


"touch not the cat without a glove"
"Much of the social history of the western world over the past three decades has involved replacing what worked with what sounded good. . ." Thomas Sowell
 
Posts: 143 | Location: South of the Arkansas, on the slopes of St. Charles Peak, Colorado territory | Registered: 25 January 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of woodman
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Changing a successful format can have unforeseen consequences. Muzzleloader fills a place that
Should not be changed,Muzzleblasts fills the need of covering ballistics and reports on production guns. Woodman
 
Posts: 357 | Location: Colorado Territories | Registered: 20 March 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Thank you for giving me that info.I'm a rank beginner,and as such just don't know where to look for information sources.I really like the format that Muzzle loader follows and would hate to see that change.It's just that I need more sources.... Big Grin


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1927 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I am not a PC guy, but I can appreciate what they stand for.

One does not have to have a fancy custom rifle, neither does one have to dress appropriately at shoots. But, if you make it a practice in Life to slide by on the cheap, that is the group you have to hang with. Might as well buy an inline with a plastic stock and use 209 primers...

I am a 100% disabled Vietnam Army Ranger veteran, and I live on social security and a VA disability pension.

It is sad to see someone come into the sport because of the romance of 250+ years ago, and the challenge, and then try and cheapen the experience.
 
Posts: 363 | Registered: 25 July 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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I whole heartily agree with you Idaho! Once a fella is smitt'n by the history bug, He'll eventually come around in due time. I have found that even living on a fixed income, little by little, good gear comes our way. Always traded upward until I find satisfaction. I've also helped others in my area to get started in the right direction without making the same early mistakes that I had made.
 
Posts: 197 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of MountainRanger
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I agree completely also. As a retired person of somewhat humble means, it takes me a while to bring enough $ to the table to purchase something, but I try my best to make sure that whatever I buy, whatever I make or trade for is as accurately made as I can make it. That is why I have made it a conscious effort that in things I make (specifically measures or pan and brush sets and my leather work items), I try to make it look like a frontiersman or mountain man might do it sitting around a fire over a winter. In other words, while my stuff will never look like it came off an assembly line, I never have to worry about it looking like it came off an assembly line, hehe

There is the love of history that I suspect we all share and the research to find out what the old fellers carried, used, made, traded for or bought and sold from a compatriot


Sua Sponte
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Well,you guys definitely have the right attitudes,I just wish someone in this area would take me on as a "project",heh.Instead,I'm just gonna have to slowly accumulate knowledge,and equipment.I knew right from the start that plastic stocked in-lines were a no go.After much thinking,and research,I purchased(with time payments)a Navy Arms replica of a Charleville musket that someone had converted to trade gun configuration.$800.00.I think,if it's the only one I end up with,it'll do a good all around job.I know there are less expensive guns out there,but I settled on this one for all-around usefullness.The research phase was fun,but I do wish the info was easier to come by...


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1927 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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I'd sure love to see pictures of your trade gun Boartooth! I have seen some pretty good look'n re-modeled, or re-worked production long guns over the years. I know this fellow out on the west coast that can take a plain T\C factory made Hawken and turn it into a work of art! This guy has a great gift and has more skills and knowledge in his little pinky than all that solid space between my ears!
 
Posts: 197 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Notchy Bob
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As the discussion has evolved toward the content of Muzzleloader magazine, and the editor is probably reading, I'll submit my humble opinion...

I still think of this journal as a historic shooting magazine. For me, the four-part serialized biographical articles don't hold much interest, although I don't want to sound too critical, and it's good to have some history in every issue. It's just that for a while it seemed this was becoming the magazine's focus and we were drifting away from guns, shooting, and traditional skills.

My first "go to" sections of the magazine are Mike Nesbitt's column (unfailingly interesting for shooters) and T.C. Albert's "how to" articles. I like seeing write-ups about antique guns and accoutrements, and the gunsmithing articles.

I understand that this is primarily a flintlock shooter's venue, and I am primarily a flintlock shooter myself at this point, but I would like to say that muzzleloaders did not become obsolete at the end of the 1840's. I have been reading some very interesting books about travel in Canada and the Rocky Mountains in the 1850's and 1860's, and muzzleloaders were still the norm for sportsmen at that time. Some of the writers had a lot to say about their percussion firearms, and the weaponry of the local folk they encountered. The point here being that historic muzzleloading firearms from the percussion era need not be ignored in the pages of Muzzleloader magazine.

With all of that said, I recently received my renewal card and re-upped for another two years of Muzzleloader as fast as I could get a check in the mail. It's still the best!

Notchy Bob


"Should have kept the old ways just as much as I could, and the tradition that guarded us. Should have rode horses. Kept dogs."

from The Antelope Wife
 
Posts: 333 | Location: Florida | Registered: 24 May 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Since I can't afford a custom made gun I made my own. I bought the parts for a smoothie. If I Remember right I paid about $430 for the parts. I managed to make a gun worth about $200. I can't afford to care about fancy, not that I don't want one. I am realistic I have something that I can afford, and I can look at the internet and dream.
 
Posts: 353 | Location: Pocono Mts. in PA | Registered: 12 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I hear ya,Bud.$800.00 was a real stretch for me,but I think it was worth it.my focus here on out is gonna be accumulating all the accoutrements and learning how to shoot this beast.folks that have seen this gun in action assure me it's capable of some good groups...we'll see.It seems to me that a .69 caliber is closer to artillery than precision rifle shooting anyway....I'll try to get some decent pics and post them.....I think it's a handsome piece,in a workman like way....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1927 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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I can relate to you Bud in PA about building your own rifle in order to get a more accurate rendition of an early style long gun! Back when I was first smitten, a good set of parts could be had for around 350 to 400 dollars. My first build was a late Lancaster type that I was very proud of at the time. I was more enamored with the shooting function and its accuracy. It was a good learning experience that led me into much study. I later parted it out and built a better, more pleasing rifle out of it. I suppose the costs of parts now days go along with most all other inflationary items, so I will not condemn the suppliers. They have to make a living too. We are pretty fortunate to have so many choices in materials of high standards. I do tend to feel a bit sorry for the folks just starting out. To buy everything needed today it will set you back anywhere from around 800 to a thousand dollars for parts alone.
 
Posts: 197 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
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quote:
I still think of this journal as a historic shooting magazine. For me, the four-part serialized biographical articles don't hold much interest, although I don't want to sound too critical, and it's good to have some history in every issue. It's just that for a while it seemed this was becoming the magazine's focus and we were drifting away from guns, shooting, and traditional skills.


That may be true, but alas, we don't know what is submitted to the editor, right? Jason can't publish what he doesn't have, and although he can send out requests to authors, if one wants more than a fluff piece, technical examinations of guns and gear take a lot more resources than researching history (well in average cases)

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
"Publisher - MUZZLELOADER"
Greenhorn
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quote:
Originally posted by mtnmike:
I get our magazine(Muzzleloader) and every issue has some-one who builds these engraved,xtra fancy guns. My question is: Am I the only that feels left out because my gun didn't cost thousands of dollars? I bought mine to supply food with many years ago,but who would carry a $ 7-10,000 rifle to brush pop with?
Maybe cause I live on disability I cannot afford these guns,,but all the years I was working,I could not have afforded one neither. So either there are alot more rich folk out there ,or somebody just likes to rub our noses in it.
What say you?



Mike,
I am sorry that you feel left out, because we are featuring articles about very talented craftspeople. That is not the purpose of the article. It is my hope that our artist articles will inspire others, either to build their own guns or to just show what skill is out there. We're not trying to rub anyone's nose in anything.

To everyone else,
I am glad most of you like the mix of articles that we are currently running, it still isn't exactly where I want it to be, but I am working on it. I too would like to have more western fur trade content and I have been working on that. There has a been a little more in the last few issues.
Jason Gatliff
Publisher - MUZZLELOADER Magazine


Jason Gatliff
Historical Enterprises, LLC
 
Posts: 6 | Location: Gallatin, TN | Registered: 05 February 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Jason,here's an idea.How about,every once in a while do an article on someone in modern times who is actually living the life...Providing a noticeable proportion of their sustenance in a period manner.I'm sure there are bunches of folks that have integrated blackpowder technology into their everyday life in fascinating ways.


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1927 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
"Publisher - MUZZLELOADER"
Greenhorn
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That is an interesting idea. I will give it some thought and discuss it with some of our writers.

Do you know of anyone who lives that way?

I do have a concern about it though as it might be a little "Backwoodsman"-Y, and might be a little out of our focus.
Jason


Jason Gatliff
Historical Enterprises, LLC
 
Posts: 6 | Location: Gallatin, TN | Registered: 05 February 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Hmm.good point.I don't know anyone personally,but over my admittedly minimal acquaintance with MtnMike,I have become convinced he has lots to teach all of us about that lifestyle....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1927 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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