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Greenhorn
Picture of Leonard
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I agree with the point-of-view that most historical muzzleloading rifles were plain. As an example, I've got a family heirloom Leman caplock that has rather plain wood but has faux striping to resemble curly maple.

My first rifle was a Lyman caplock GPR, which I traded (with a few extra coins) for a rather plain wood but nether-the-less unique HALF-STOCK and brass fixtured custom flintlock, which is my only muzzleloading rifle right now. she shoots well, and I would have no qualms about taking her anywhere I would go.

So I guess I am continuing the family tradition of relatively cheap but practical firearms!
 
Posts: 46 | Location: Iowa | Registered: 28 November 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Crawdad
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If that's what he likes and he's not a jerk about it, to each his own.

After that said, I sure like looking at them but, more importantly, admiring the skill it took to build that masterpiece.
 
Posts: 678 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: 30 January 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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It's comforting that at this time there are people capable of carrying on the craft at that level. Still, it's best if they are used. A gun that's only for decoration is no different that a painting or a vase of flowers.
 
Posts: 507 | Registered: 14 August 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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My primary hunting rifle looks like it had been drug behind a truck after 5 or 6 years of heavy hunting use, I like it that way. Pushing through a greenbrier studded privet thicket in the dark will add "character" to a rifle in a hurry.

I admire the workmanship of a fine custom fantasy rifle but have no desire to own one
as it would be confined to a corner of my gun safe never to see the light of day unless I pulled it out to show it to friends.

I build them to use them, If I ever get good enough to embellish one of my builds with all the bells and whistles, it will go to the woods with me just like all my previous builds have.
 
Posts: 47 | Registered: 04 March 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of andy*
posted Hide Post
I agree that they should be used....although you do get funny looks when you are using an original gun...or one by a famous maker while hunting....lol
Andy


Follow me I am the Infantry
 
Posts: 668 | Location: Everson, Washington | Registered: 27 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Every hobby is the same. The equipment used can be purchased with whatever the participant wishes to spend.

So, there are those who stay on a tight budget and those who do not.

Back in the early 1970's, this college student purchased a Sharon gun Barrel Hawken rifle kit at the cost of $250. After a year went by, I decided I wouldn't be able to build it and paid $250 to have it built. Wow, $500 for a college student to pay for a WHAT, a muzzleloader was unheard of.

Some years later, I wanted a long rifle, one of 45 caliber because I found the 10 LB 54 cal tired me out on a 20 shot trail walk between the recoil and it's weight.

So, I ended up getting pair of custom built long rifles for rendezvous competitions. I also discovered that bad weather was taking its toll on my Sharon Hawken's stock so I purchased a Lyman GP 54 rifle just for hunting. In 2004 I purchased a Pedersoi Blue Ridge 54cal flint long rifle, once more just for hunting.

The rifles I get specifically for hunting have peep sights and can't be used at rendezvous so my real nice rifles are built with rendezvous shooting in mind.

Load fast and aim slow.
 
Posts: 1726 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: 08 March 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I noticed a letter to the Editor in the last Muzzleloader commenting on the lack of articles about the western fur trade.

I'm of the same feeling except in my opinion, the magazine is becoming a historical magazine rather than a muzzleloader magazine. Don't get me wrong, the historical articles are great, well documented, and quite interesting BUT that's not why I purchase the magazine. Look at it this way, it contains one muzzleloader article, one trekking article, one hunting article, and the rest are for the most part, history.

I like the idea that it covers trekking for the trekkers, hunting for those who like that but let's look at the last issue:

Doing it Yourself 6 pages OK
Masterpiece Rifle of the Cumberland
14 pages It is about muzzleloaders and very heavy on history
Cache of the Hollow Tree 9 pages history
Shooting the Bull 6 1/4 pages muzzleloaders
Portals in Time 6 1/4 pages history
Dispatches from New England 8 pages history
Rockhouses and Rhododendron 7 pages trekking
Jesse Brennan 10 pages muzzleloaders
On the Game Trail 4 pages hunting
The Yellow Stone 5 pages history

That is 42 pages of history. ZZzzzzzzzzzz

Like I said, the only saving grace is the fact that the history articles are excellent and I love history but that's not why I purchase the publication.

Load fast and aim slow.
 
Posts: 1726 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: 08 March 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
Picture of Hanshi
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I also like the historical articles a lot. But I, too, would like to see more articles about the rifles/guns, using them, caring for them and enjoying them. And I don't mean the 5K to 30K guns that wouldn't be taken into the woods, anyway. All mine together wouldn't be worth that much. And some articles should discuss the more popular factory guns such as what comes from T/C, Pedersoli and others. Most of us own one or more of those, including me, and they have their place in the woods and on the range.


*Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.*
 
Posts: 3506 | Location: Maine (by way of Georgia then Va.) | Registered: 26 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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While a custom firearm is something to always look forward to, my rifles are tools to fill the freezer, and tackle the hunting fields as my ancesters did...and the were poor North Woods trappers and hunter's who would never think of spending the dollars for anything more than the absolutly needed....it's more importand to me to have a rifle that shoots center, and does what I ask it too...my T/C New Englander and Scout fill that bill.

On the other hand the custom gun makers are true artist, and their products are the works of Master's, and I can look at them all day long...Gary


" You do with your scalp as you wish and don't be telling us what to with ours."
 
Posts: 158 | Location: lake champlain, vt | Registered: 03 January 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I like the historical articles in Muzzleloader best. For me that's what makes Muzzleloader stand out, and why it's the only magazine I subscribe to. There's only so much that can be said about guns without becoming criminally redundant. That's why I haven't bought a gun magazine for about 25 years. And anyone can learn more than I care to know about the imported stuff by stopping at the sporting goods store. The mix of articles in Muzzleloader is very good, although I would like more on the western fur trade. But if no one is writing and submitting those articles I guess they won't be there. I'm happy with the magazine.
 
Posts: 507 | Registered: 14 August 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I'm going to jump in here and say that I really like the present balance of articles also.I'm very interested in the historical aspect of our hobby.Let me explain,I've been a history buff all my life,but until recently,I hadn't realized just how much of the early history of our Continent I've missed.Right now I'm in the position of a rank newbie just discovering how much I have to learn,both in the History aspect,and the shooting.I like shooting of all types,but,again,until recently,I hadn't realized just how much I was missing out on with muzzle-stuffers.I seriously underestimated their utility,and the fun associated with shooting them.So,even the articles aimed at rank beginners are interesting to me,and I value Mike N. very much for what he has,and will teach me.For the same reason,I very much value everything you all share,because I realize every one of you guys has something to teach me.Please don't change The Muzzleloader,I like it the way it is......


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1939 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I'm also a history buff and like the articles too. It's just that the magazine is top heavy with history.

Load fast and aim slow.
 
Posts: 1726 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: 08 March 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<mtnmike>
posted
I have to agree on the history articles,give us more on how our own people lived and worked,,never gave squat for the no-name british officer/squire. My people have lived in this area since the 1600's,their stories are far more interesting/informative,because I still do a lot of these things everyday almost 300 years later.
 
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Booshway
Picture of NWTF Longhunter
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I saw in my latest issue of Muzzleloader the article on Jesse Brennan and the guns he makes. I bought my first Brennan gun from Jesse's dad Judson Brennan in 1976, before Jesse was born. Jud lived in Michigan not too far from me before he moved to Alaska in 1985. From that first gun in 1976 until he moved in 85 I bought three rifles, an English Fowler and a flintlock pistol from Jud. Back then a Brennan gun was more affordable then they are now. Jud made me a "fancy" longrifle in 1977, a .54 flintlock with inlays and relief carving. The price for that gun was $1600.00 which was a lot of money for a custom gun back then. It probably wouldn't buy the parts today.

I've hunted a lot with that rifle and it has taken it's share of deer. It has a few battle scars from being used but that only adds to the value (to me)


This message has been edited. Last edited by: NWTF Longhunter,
 
Posts: 797 | Location: Michigan | Registered: 29 April 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of NWTF Longhunter
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some of the work Jud is doing now, that yellow is GOLD.. Eeker






Jud Brennan Rifle

"Words can not describe the quality and the beauty of this rifle. and pictures do not do it justice. For those of you who collect flintlocks when I say the name Jud Brennan that"s all I really need to say. For those just starting or thinking about collecting flintlocks, there are thousands of builders out there offering prices of a few hundred dollars to tens of thousands. Jud Brennan may be the finest builder in the world. If he is not he would be in the top select few. To have him build a rifle equal to the quality and workmanship of this fine piece would take many months, perhaps years and lots of bucks. I do not profess to knowing Mr. Brennan's production schedule or his price points. I do know he is well known in the art of building fine flintlocks. Please note the beautiful octagon barrel, rifle is dressed with lots of silver and brass highly engraved This rifle is featured here ://contemporarymakers.blogspot/2012/12/jud-brennan-rifle.html here you can see about 20 additional pictures as well as some additional written information. No waiting here, lets get together and I will ship it to you immediately. Should you desire to purchase this rifle we will need to discuss...$35,000.00"

Contact Information

This message has been edited. Last edited by: NWTF Longhunter,
 
Posts: 797 | Location: Michigan | Registered: 29 April 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Crawdad
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I had one custom built rifle, a beautiful John & Caleb Vincent. A great shooter. Got a lot of compliments on that rifle and appreciated them all. First rifle I had that was so accurate I could groundhog hunt with it. All Summer long and then deer season I must have had that rifle out in the woods 6 or 7 months a year when I owned it.

She was well used and pretty scared up when I sold her but a real joy to shoot and to own.
 
Posts: 678 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: 30 January 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Crawdad
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quote:
some of the work Jud is doing now, that yellow is GOLD..


Holy smokes!!!! Smiler
 
Posts: 678 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: 30 January 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of NWTF Longhunter
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The master in his work shop

 
Posts: 797 | Location: Michigan | Registered: 29 April 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of NWTF Longhunter
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Here's a couple knives that Jud made for me in the late 70's





 
Posts: 797 | Location: Michigan | Registered: 29 April 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of NWTF Longhunter
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Juds knife work today

 
Posts: 797 | Location: Michigan | Registered: 29 April 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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