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Pilgrim
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Me and a partner were discussing new movies and we started talking about the new movie revenant men ,after looking at the previews ,the first thing that came to mind was the story of hugh glass , well imagine my surprise being at the bookstore and thumbing through the newest muzzleloader ,and in the back was how this movie was made and indeed i was right about the mountain man glass
 
Posts: 95 | Location: Both alaska and washington state | Registered: 05 August 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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From interviews with some of the actors they actually earned their money filming this one. Freezing cold, wet, sometimes very odd or long hours. Sure hope it turns out as well as I hope n not another let down. Of course IMHO they still were way way over paid. Military paid a bit over poverty wages to risk life n limb n millions paid to make a movie doesn't make much sense to me. But that's America
 
Posts: 229 | Location: Southeast Pa. | Registered: 03 February 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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Four of us from the gun club went to the matinee this afternoon. With two of us somewhat familiar with the story. The cinematography deserves some sort of award as does the musical score. While the basic story line of Mr. Glass' remarkable survival and successful return to Ft. Kiowa exists in the movie, I can assure you that the area of South Dakota that "The Wrestle" and "The Crawl" actually took place looks nothing like the rugged mountains shown throughout the movie.

Did I enjoy the movie? Yes! Would I go again? Yes! Does Leo win an Oscar? Maybe!

The guys in make-up created some realistically gruesome wounds on Leo.
 
Posts: 24 | Location: Southern Minnesota | Registered: 24 May 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pilgrim
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yeah ,quite awhile back I read a book on the different mountain men and hugh glass was in it interesting to say the least most people today could not fathom his situation much less survive it back then there weren't any APPS for that
 
Posts: 95 | Location: Both alaska and washington state | Registered: 05 August 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Of course, I have not yet seen the movie, however I know what is supposed to be the real story of Hugh Glass.
One of the two men left to stay with him until he died from the grizz attack is supposed to be a young Jim Bridger - later a famous mountain man himself. When Glass finally caught up with Bridger he decided that because of Bridger's youth and inexperience, that he would forgive him for abandoning him.


Know what you believe in. Fight for your beliefs. Never compromise away your rights.
 
Posts: 898 | Location: Cherokee Land, Tenasi | Registered: 06 January 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pilgrim
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Rancocas ,
this is true of glass he could have rightly killed him for it I read a pretty long account of it and do not recall what happened to the other man .It is interesting to compare the eras if that happened today there would be no accountability insisted upon their actions in those bygone days a man stood on his own asked of no quarter and gave none if the transgression warranted it , hmm imagine where we would be today if all that still applied ?
 
Posts: 95 | Location: Both alaska and washington state | Registered: 05 August 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Hiya boys!

Fitzgerald is the name of the other man that was with Bridger. During the months of Hugh's journey of recovery, Fitzgerald had quit the brigade and enlisted in the army. Later, Glass did find Fitzgerald at one of the army frontier forts. Glass reconned that it was not in his best interest to kill Fitzgerald since the army would have taken a dim view of him doing so. Glass did get his rifle & possibles back from Fitzgerald.

Regards, xfox


The forest is a wilderness only to those that fear it, silent only to those that hear nothing. The forest is a friend to those that dwell within its' nature and it is filled with the sounds of life to those that listen.
 
Posts: 427 | Location: Bitterroot Valley | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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Sounds like the REAL Hugh Glass must have been a forgiving kind of fellow! There have been many wounded brother's in arms left behind for various reasons throughout history.
 
Posts: 166 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of andy*
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Saw the movie Last night. It is not for the squeamish , it is a brutal film.
I did like the visual impact of the movie , it is beautifully filmed.
The way the actors were outfitted was better than I had hoped.
Hollywood did play fast and loose with locations and history however.
I would have enjoyed the movie better if they didn't have real names in it ( Glass , Bridger , Major Henry etc ...) and just had a movie about a fur trapper who was mauled by a bear and what happened next.
Andy


Follow me I am the Infantry
 
Posts: 665 | Location: Everson, Washington | Registered: 27 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of MountainRanger
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I'm really looking forward to seeing this movie. I've noticed that even reviewers who normally only give high ratings to those movies that are designed to raise up certain 'unusual and deviant' practices that are in the news these days, have rated The Revenant very highly. Even the trailer is excellent.


Sua Sponte
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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Well it won best picture, male lead and director awards at the Golden Globes last night. Haven't seen it yet but planning to
 
Posts: 229 | Location: Southeast Pa. | Registered: 03 February 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
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Critics/awards committee know/knew nothing of Glass or life in the high country in that era so they were not basing their votes on accuracy.

Attire, guns, accoutrements, etc were well represented IMO.


A movie that takes literary license from a novel that takes literary license left quite a bit to be desired in the story of Glass. Early scenes were cumbersome at best and took too long in portraying the message. First discrepancy I noticed was after killing the elk Glass didn't reload until hearing the battle at camp. NO ONE would have done that in hostile territory. IIRC at least 3 shots were fired with flinter without reloading and one with frizzen open. I know I'm old and deaf but even my wife had trouble understanding most of the dialog. At least he French and Indian dialog was subtitled.

The movie did remind me how tough life was in that time period and place - not all shining times easing along on horse in great weather and settling in to a nice log cabin. I'm glad to have a lot of our creature comforts and not have to live with out refrigeration. I doubt the movie will generate any additional interest in traditional muzzleloading as I had hoped it would.
TC
 
Posts: 128 | Location: Cedar Valley, Travis Co., TX | Registered: 24 December 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of MountainRanger
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What? Only three shots without reloading? Dang.. I would have thought that given these were mountain men from a relatively more modern era than the F&I period that I prefer, read about and try to emulate in both dress and accoutrements, that these guys would have been issued the more modern, five shot, semi-automatic flintlocks HAHAHA.

Anyway, I sure agree with you about modern conveniences. With me, it's heat. The older I get, the less able I am to absorbe and retain heat.


Sua Sponte
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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If anyone goes to the movies to see facts/true actual happening,is the same people who believe our History Books and what we were taught in school.
Go to get in out of the weather and enjoy some "entertainment" brain dead time...
Mickey Mouse isn't real,,shocker,but we watch it with the Grandkids and laugh and enjoy it..same thing applies here,,,
Most difficult to get a Movie Star with scurvy,arthritis,bad teeth and over all poor health to " be Hugh Glass or Liver Eater Johnson.Look at a real picture of Liver Eater Johnson,,look real close to Redford doesn't he, why they could be twins?????
Got to wonder just how truthful any of them were in their retelling of the Heroic Events leading up to their returning to civilized man...not that any of them would "Blow smoke"
Go watch the movie like we watched Danial Boon split the tree with the Tomahawk,,while wearing a Coon skin cap,,,enjoy the buttered popcorn..

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Walking Crow,
 
Posts: 1736 | Registered: 11 February 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Posts: 1736 | Registered: 11 February 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of MountainRanger
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Great post, WC... pass the salt, please.


Sua Sponte
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Hunts4Deer
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My wife, son, and I went to see it last weekend. Overall, we were disappointed. Too much stark, harsh, reality, and not enough charm. The camp scenes as described in the Muzzleloader article were shown very quickly, considering all the effort that went into it. Lots of non-stop action, as all of the movies seem to be today. But at the expense of the story, I felt - not enough sense of his plight, and goal to get to the fort, and get his gun back. More like, what's going to happen to this poor guy next? If one of his big goals was to get his gun back, that was lost in the cutting room floor maybe.

It's not Jeremiah Johnson, or Man in the Wilderness. We felt that there weren't any characters you got to know well enough to actually like or even identify with. The dialogue was filled with the F word and N word (referring to Indians). We just didn't see this as a movie that we will look forward to buying the DVD to watching again.

Certainly the makeup was great. He did indeed look like he had been torn apart by a bear. The scenery was very rugged, cold, desolate. Looked like old growth forest in some scenes.

The music score? I honestly don't even remember any music. In Jeremiah Johnson, the music really made a huge contribution to the whole feel of the movie.

Worth seeing once on the big screen, but not destined to be part of my video library.


John
Vive le Roy!
 
Posts: 510 | Location: Colony of Maryland | Registered: 04 November 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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I saw this one too (first movie I've seen in the theater in I think 4 years!) I really liked some parts, and others, well? My wife kept elbowing me when I'd chuckle about things like multiple shots without reloading. Or how these guys were always jumping into icy water for no reason. A lot of other little things that only guys who spend a lot of time actually outdoors, and especially guys like this crowd who know the accoutrements etc. well. Have to just chalk that up to Hollywood I think. They're paid to tell a story to the general population, not cater to us (but it sure is cool when they do!) And yes, its really violent. One last gripe: all Hollywood movies have to add the murdered family to movies. I guess that makes it more emotional or something. Like being left for dead and stripped of your rifle isn't a good enough reason to want to have a few words with the fella who left you!

All that being said, some things were great. The cinematography was beautiful, and I too thought the music was excellent. After seeing it, I read somewhere that the movie was shot 100% with natural light, no lighting at all. I'm not a moviemaker, but that is pretty incredible and I kind of wish I would have known it prior to seeing the movie so I could pay more attention.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Jared,
 
Posts: 207 | Location: The Folle Avoine | Registered: 19 June 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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Also I should add that DiCaprio was good in the movie, but i thought the English guy who played Fitzgerald was excellent.
 
Posts: 207 | Location: The Folle Avoine | Registered: 19 June 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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quote:
Originally posted by Jared:
I saw this one too (first movie I've seen in the theater in I think 4 years!) I really liked some parts, and others, well? My wife kept elbowing me when I'd chuckle about things like multiple shots without reloading. Or how these guys were always jumping into water with ice ledges for no reason. A lot of other little things that only guys who spend a lot of time actually outdoors, and especially guys like this crowd who know the accoutrements etc. well. Have to just chalk that up to Hollywood I think. They're paid to tell a story to the general population, not cater to us (but it sure is cool when they do!) And yes, its really violent. One last gripe: all Hollywood movies have to add the murdered family to movies. I guess that makes it more emotional or something. Like being left for dead and stripped of your rifle isn't a good enough reason to want to have a few words with the fella who left you!

All that being said, some things were great. The cinematography was beautiful, and I too thought the music was excellent. After seeing it, I read somewhere that the movie was shot 100% with natural light, no lighting at all. I'm not a moviemaker, but that is pretty incredible and I kind of wish I would have known it prior to seeing the movie so I could pay more attention.


You mean to tell my you could't reload and fire a flintlock pistol three times a minute at full gallop on horseback while being chased by a war party?!?!
 
Posts: 505 | Location: SC | Registered: 03 May 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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