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Free Trapper
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Here is a great book for your early reading young'un's. It had me mesmerized as a lad way back in the last century! "The Biggest Bear" by Lynd Ward. I just had to have a copy for my shelf and enjoy reading it to my youngest grandchildren. http://www.amazon.com/The-Bigg...d-Ward/dp/0395150248
 
Posts: 164 | Registered: 15 January 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I remember reading that!


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1452 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of Deercop
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When I was in grade school/junior high, I read just about anything by William O'Steele I could get my hands on.
 
Posts: 649 | Location: Clovis, New Mexico | Registered: 21 March 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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quote:
Originally posted by MountainRanger:

Try this one:

Crazy Horse and Custer: The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors
by Stephen E. Ambrose


That's it! Thanks so much! Im going to get one this weekend!


"...having Providence for their founder and Nature for shepherd, gardener, and historian."
 
Posts: 44 | Location: Alabama | Registered: 01 May 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of MountainRanger
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Took a while for me to find here, but I thought I had it. Glad I was able to put you on the scent Wink


Sua Sponte
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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Another good one for kids if you can find a copy is "Wildwood Wisdom" written ages ago. Near every page has drawings n short explanations for everything from fire starting to making clothing from hides n how to tan em, as a kid running the woods I learned tons from that ol book. Found it in of all places the school library
 
Posts: 229 | Location: Southeast Pa. | Registered: 03 February 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Free Trapper
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The entire Gauntlet Runner Series. Have read 5 books and anxiously waiting for volume 6.
 
Posts: 180 | Location: Harrisburg, Pa | Registered: 26 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pilgrim
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Give your heart to the hawks,journal of a trapper,journals of lewis and clark
 
Posts: 55 | Location: piney woods of east texas | Registered: 23 December 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Greenhorn
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I just finished CRAZY HORSE: The Strange Man of the Oglalas by Mari Sandoz. The book was copyrighted in 1942 and much of the information is derived from personal interviews with people that knew Crazy Horse and were still alive when the research had begun for the book. It is impressive in it's detail and written in a manor that I find very enjoyable to read. The map and dates near the front of the book give you locations of events during Crazy Horse's time. The glossary in the back also included the names and relationship of the major players be they the Native Americans or Military personnel.

Once I got started it was hard to put down. I would suggest it for your list of books to read before checking out.
 
Posts: 24 | Location: Southern Minnesota | Registered: 24 May 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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Man there are so many, pretty much depends on subject matter, time period, fact or fiction. Long ago back in Jr high I found Wildwood Wisdom in the library n fell in love with it. Good woman found a reprint on line n ordered it for me. It's very basic but gives a vast amount of info for beginners to get started yet gives ideas for older practioners to experiment with. Written in 1945 by Ellsworth Jaeger IMHO its a classic every beginer ought to read. Since it showed up in the post I've spent hours going back n forth through it.
 
Posts: 229 | Location: Southeast Pa. | Registered: 03 February 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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Here are two books that anyone interested in the Rocky Mountain Fur Trade should read.

The first book has everything that you ever wanted to know about COURAGEOUS COLTER and COMPANIONS by L.R. Colter-Frick.

The author is a relation to John Colter and has been researching his life since 1954.

The second book is about a man that, imho, far surpassed L&C in the exploration and mapping of the northwest rivers. His name is David Thompson, fur trader, explorer, surveyor, and mapmaker, as well as a field partner of the NWC.

SOURCES of the RIVER by Jack Nisbit

Regards, xfox


The forest is a wilderness only to those that fear it, silent only to those that hear nothing. The forest is a friend to those that dwell within its' nature and it is filled with the sounds of life to those that listen.
 
Posts: 426 | Location: Bitterroot Valley | Registered: 23 October 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
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quote:

The second book is about a man that, imho, far surpassed L&C in the exploration and mapping of the northwest rivers. His name is David Thompson, fur trader, explorer, surveyor, and mapmaker, as well as a field partner of the NWC.


Several good books on Thompson. He was very accomplished! I have not read that one yet. I grew up in NW Montana and there are several things named after him there.


Experience is the best teacher, hunger good sauce.
Osborne Russell Journal of a Trapper
 
Posts: 208 | Location: SW Montana | Registered: 17 December 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I just finished reading "Cape Flattery" by Lois Arnold. What a great story wound around historical facts. Ms. Arnold created quite an epic tale that combined information from her Great Grandmothers memoirs and the that of Anna Petrovna, a Russian noble lady who was on the Saint Nickolas when she was wrecked near destruction island off the Washington coast. Everyone onboard got safely ashore but then their troubles began, the local Indians captured then and they ended up living with the Indians for 2 1/2 years.

Ms. Arnold did considerable research in order to portray her Great Grandmother as the young Mennonite living in Russia and then having to include so much information concerning Russia America so she could put both ladies on the Saint Nickolas at the same time when she wrecked. Hew writing skill brings her character's into the readers mind much the same as Louis L'Amour did.

I highly recommend the book to anybody who is interested in the living conditions of those living during the fur trade era in Russia America (Alaska) or the west coast of Washington State.

Load fast and aim slow.
 
Posts: 1723 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: 08 March 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pilgrim
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1.The Dark and Bloody River
2. The Frontiersman
3. Killer Angels
4. Charlie Mike
5. A boy and his gun (a favorite from my youth)
 
Posts: 69 | Location: Davidsville , PA | Registered: 10 August 2016Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
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I just finished reading Astoria, by Peter Stark. What an amazing book. It sure points out all the grueling hardships both groups of people had while trying to establish the post. One group went by sea and the other, overland. They both had their fair share of troubles.

I'd never heard of Marie Dorion till reading this book. She experienced every hardship and more than most mountain men. What a woman.

Load fast and aim slow.
 
Posts: 1723 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: 08 March 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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