Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Gardens n saveing seeds
 Login/Join
 
Graybeard
posted
Anybody garden n save heritage seeds year to year? I grow Amish paste tomato's and save seeds year to year. Also some flower seeds of older flowers. Had some seeds from a Polish paste tomato but in moving several times they got lost , got em from an old guy down at work 35+ years back, great tomatoes n sorry they got lost. Hope to get a few seeds from the grape vines this year n either start some new vines or plant them along the trail one day. Not much out their that doesn't munch on grapes when they are around. May plant some old style corn just for the seeds, the older the breed the better. Hate to lose so many varieties through hybridization n gmo manipulation. This is in history because food n gardening are essential to history and
 
Posts: 229 | Location: Southeast Pa. | Registered: 03 February 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pilgrim
posted Hide Post
Grandparents on my fathers side married around 1917.We are still planting the same okra that they started with. Pop said it was prob. give to them from their folks. A couple of years ago I was fussing about trying to find a tomie-toe tomato like my grandmother used to plant for me a long time ago. A friend at work brought me some plants that his 90 something year old father always raised. Now I save these, taste really good.
 
Posts: 82 | Location: north georgia | Registered: 12 April 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of MountainRanger
posted Hide Post
My Marie graduated from Va Tech as did one of her daughters and we still get publications from them. Seems to me that sometime in the recent past the horticulture department or maybe the AG dept did a project regarding heritage vegetables. I really don't recall the specifics of it, but If you are interested, I can try to contact them and get some information... At least maybe I can find someone who will point you in the direction of some organization who sells or swaps heritage vegetable seeds. Seems I recall something about that in the article. You could also look online for "swapping heritage seeds" or some such.


Sua Sponte
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
Picture of MountainRanger
posted Hide Post
 
Posts: 460 | Location: SW Virginia (New River Valley) | Registered: 13 August 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
posted Hide Post
Thanks Mountainranger, I've purchased seed from both. Heritage veggies just seem to taste better to me. More work but worth the effort and in the long run ya save money getting to replant saved seeds in the future
 
Posts: 229 | Location: Southeast Pa. | Registered: 03 February 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
posted Hide Post
Almost all of my garden is heirloom seed. For corn try out some Painted Mountain. It's developed for northern climates with cold wet springs and dry summers. You can eat it off the cob in the milk stage or let it mature and dry for parched corn or corn meal. It's descended from Mandan Indian corn varieties. We love it.
 
Posts: 214 | Location: Big Arm Montana | Registered: 17 September 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Booshway
posted Hide Post
We don't have enough room for corn,but we've been trying to find tomato varieties that tough it out,and produce in our area.....


Beer is proof that God loves us,and wants us to be happy-B. Franklin
 
Posts: 1939 | Location: Oreegun Territory | Registered: 24 March 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
posted Hide Post
If you're going to plant heirloom corn, I hope you are far enough away from hybrids that you don't get a cross, and thus lose the heirloom variety in the next planting.

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Hivernant
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by larryp:
Almost all of my garden is heirloom seed. For corn try out some Painted Mountain. It's developed for northern climates with cold wet springs and dry summers. You can eat it off the cob in the milk stage or let it mature and dry for parched corn or corn meal. It's descended from Mandan Indian corn varieties. We love it.
We have won several blue ribbons with that variety at the fairs in NH & ME . Two thumbs up on it!!!! Smiler
 
Posts: 109 | Location: NH | Registered: 05 July 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
posted Hide Post
Dave that's the biggest problem of all. Pollen can travel so far it's getting near impossible to keep heritage seed pure. Near everything planted anymore is a hybred of some sort and keeping separation is near impossible anymore
 
Posts: 229 | Location: Southeast Pa. | Registered: 03 February 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Factor
posted Hide Post
I just dried and stored some Korean Gochu pepper seeds. Very peppery in taste but hardly any heat. Not a North American heirloom, but an heirloom and tasty none the less.

My co-worker is Korean, and he got them from his mom's garden...they have to grow them where she lives as the ones at the Asian market are too expensive, and she dries the seeds and replants them annually. He brought them in for me to taste, then told me about his mom, so I kept the seeds.

LD


It's not what you know, it's what you can prove
 
Posts: 3843 | Location: People's Republic of Maryland | Registered: 10 November 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Graybeard
posted Hide Post
That's cool and a neat way to get them. Watched a show on an international seed bank in case of an apocalypse. Only one problem , its on an island in the Arctic ocean. Wonder on how they figure to get there to retrieve them and distribution after an event. It was pretty cool in that they are constantly rotating new seeds in to replace those that don't have a long self life.
 
Posts: 229 | Location: Southeast Pa. | Registered: 03 February 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 


2014 Historical Enterprises, LLC